Jump to content

Welcome to the new Traders Laboratory! Please bear with us as we finish the migration over the next few days. If you find any issues, want to leave feedback, get in touch with us, or offer suggestions please post to the Support forum here.

  • Welcome Guests

    Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at Traders Laboratory such as interacting with members, access to all forums, downloading attachments, and eligibility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE Traders Laboratory account here.

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 07/31/08 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    bootstrap

    I Look Back Now and Wonder

    I wasn't sure where to put this, so the powers that be can move it if they see fit. I put it here for anyone who is just starting out and wondering what it really takes to become part of that elite club of profitable traders. I lurk on several trading forums. I join a few and make a few posts. One thing that I rarely see is the painful path one took to becoming successful. So for all you beginners here is what becoming successful took. For my fellow brethren that are already in the club have a good laugh. The markets had always lured me as a kid. I would read the paper and make predictions. Sometimes they were right; sometimes not. Then one day I got that famous commodity-trading flyer, sent my money off and took the plunge. My first stab at trading was commodities and I started with $5k in 1991. I was using the strategy as outlined by the guru. The account was gone within a few months. Well that didn’t work. I thought, people do this everyday and make money why not me. So off to the library. I read every book the Memphis library had on trading and investing. I paper traded the strategies I found while I built my bankroll back up. I learned exits, set-ups, position, expectancy, market psychology, and portfolio management. I soon realized that I was reading the same thing over and over no matter which book I checked out. Time to build my strategy. I am ready to do this. I bought a new computer, Metastock Pro 6.0, and opened an account with $30k. Its 1995, and this is my shot. By 1997 I was toast again. The family life went to hell in a hand basket, and I thought I could trade through the difficult times. The result was an account with a balance of $2500. Back to the drawing board. Took care of the personal stuff. Lived like a monk raising capital. Worked nights and watched the market during the day. Took a second job on the weekends to raise more money. Then one day out of the blue, the little red and green candles started to make sense. I saw patterns develop over and over in the same spots. I placed a trade and made a profit. But I had done this before. I removed the MACD from my charts. Placed another trade and made a profit. Maybe I am on to something. Removed the channel indicator that I stumbled across. I could still see the action and new what the MACD was doing and where the action was in the channel without them even being on the chart. I even stopped drawing trend lines. It was just me and the screen. I planned every trade. I knew exactly when, where, and why I entered and exited. I was patient. I became a predator. Lurking and waiting. I took every shot the market gave me. If it started to go wrong, I got out quick and waited. If the market did not give me an opening, oh well. There is always tomorrow. By the fall of 1999, I was consistently profitable and have been ever since. For those that are waiting for the sales pitch, there isn’t one. For those that are waiting for me to expose some great secret, well there isn’t one of those either. What I will give you are a few simple pointers that I learned the hard way. And the sad part is, most will stilll learn these the hardway. 1)Take everything you read with a grain of salt. That includes this post. 2)Never pay for a system. It is just not that easy. 3)If something comes up in your life that is distracting, stop trading. 4)Plan every aspect of your trade down to the smallest detail, and plan for every possible outcome. 5)Develop your own strategy. Don’t let someone tell you that you can’t trade a simple moving average if you truly believe you can. 6)Test the strategy in the market that you will be trading. If you like the results, trade it in another totally unrelated market and see if it still holds up. 7)Paper trading is ok, but there is nothing that truly tests the strategy like hard earned cash. 8)You will have to make sacrifices in order to make it. I still do. In the middle of my learning period I was working 18 hours a day during the week and 12 on the weekend. 9)You are responsible for everything when it comes to trading. That includes stop running, bad fills, limit moves, your PC crashing. I mean everything. See #4 10)And last but probably most important, don’t be afraid of failure. Just do like Edison and go, “Well that didn’t work”. Good trading to you all.
  2. 3 points
    LindsayBev

    Best Candlestick Book / PDF??

    Donald, here is the pdf version of the book, if you are interested. While a bit "salesman-like" in its approach (all of what he claims cannot possibly be true or it would be the Holy Grail), it was packed full with pictures, commentary and helpful information. Enjoy. Profitable_Candlestick_Trading-HERE.pdf
  3. 2 points
    bootstrap

    Why Screen Time Is Important

    Here is something that should get pretty lively.. Since everyone keeps telling you that screen time is important, there has to be something to it. But nobody is telling you what you should be looking for. What is it going to teach you? There has to be something that those who do this for a living see that you don’t. Well there is. And just like the magician that exposed the secrets to magic tricks on national TV, I am going to tell you what we see. But before I do remember one thing. Take everything you read in a forum or book, or hear from a guru or in a seminar with a grain of salt. Question everything. Only when you prove it to yourself, does it become the rule. What I am about to share can be found on thousands of sites and in countless books. If you have done any research at all, you have come across Dr. Elder’s triple screen, or some permutation of it. You understand the principles behind using multiple frames of reference. What has most likely not been explained to you is why it works or how to apply it correctly. In most cases you are only given a single example. Single example you say? Yes, when most first stumble across using multiple time frames, they follow the rules of: Use the upper time frame to identify the trend, the middle time frame for the set-up, and the lowest time frame to enter. If by chance you are not familiar with the triple screen just goggle “triple screen +elder”. Trading instruments exhibt three different types of market action in any given frame of reference. You use multiple frames of reference (i.e. Time or ticks) to identify the current market environment. These markets are: Trending, Trading, and Volatile. Why screen time is so important is that all instruments do not exhibit the characteristics of Trending in the upper time frame, Trading in the middle, and Volatile in the lower at all times. They can be in any one of the following combinations at any given time: Trending/Trading/Volatile Trending/Volatile/Trading Trading/Volatile/Trending Trading/Trending/Volatile Volatile/Trending/Trading Volatile/Trading/Trending Or any one of 84 possible market combinations if you consider Volatile/Volatile/Volatile. Like the major pairs in Forex, the combinations I listed are what I consider the major market combinations. The elusive secret that you are looking for, and what screen time teaches you, is to identify which market combination you are in and then how to trade what you see. Or better yet, when to stay on the sidelines. Each combination requires a different strategy, and some may not be tradeable at all. If you are trading across a broad range of instruments, you only need to master one. The fewer instruments you trade, the more market combinations you may have to learn. But you have to learn them one at a time and only add the next one once the first is mastered. But you ask what about Trending/Trending/Trading? Or how about Volatile/Volatile/Volatile? Or if I use Weekly/Daily/Hourly I get Trending/Trading/Volatile but if I use Daily/Hourly/Min I get Trading/Volatile/Trending. One step at a time grasshopper. One step at a time. As I mentioned there are 84 possible combinations. Multiply this across thousands of instruments and countless frames of reference, and I hope you get the picture. You do not have to learn them all. You only have to learn the few that fit you, your chosen instrument and frames of reference. Find the market combinations that are most prevalent and learn to trade only those. This is why it takes screen time to learn to do this, and why each trader is different. It is also why three traders in the same instrument will be doing something different. Trader A will scalp, trader B will be a buyer, and trader C will be seller, and they all make money. They are using different frames of reference and therefore see a different market
  4. 2 points
    rangerdoc

    Wyckoff Resources

    I'm not one to make a habit of bumping old threads, but based on earlier discussion, this is clearly the best place to post a link to the original Wyckoff course: The Richard D Wyckoff Method of Trading and Investing in Stocks: A Course of Instruction in Stock Market Science and Technique. Wyckoff - Course.pdf
  5. 2 points
    DbPhoenix

    Trading The Wyckoff Way

    Put simply, support is the price at which those who have enough money to make a difference are willing to show their support by retarding, halting, and reversing the decline by buying. Resistance is the price at which those who have enough money to make a difference attempt to retard, halt, and reverse a rise by selling. Whether one calls this money professional or big or smart or institutional or crooked or manipulative or (fill in the blank) is irrelevant. If repeated attempts to sell below this support level are met by buying which is sufficient to turn price back, these little reversals will eventually form a line, or zone. Ditto with resistance. A swing high or low represents a point at which traders are no longer able to find trades. Whether that point represents important support or resistance will be seen the next time traders push price in that direction. But everyone knows this point, even if they aren't following a chart. It exists independently of the trader and his lines and charts and indicators and displays. It is the point beyond which price could not go. Hence its importance, both to those who want to see price move higher and those who don't. The first two posts to this thread address these matters, as do others here and there. However, finding S&R in real charts in real time takes more than just a couple of posts. But one must understand the nature of support -- and resistance -- itself before he begins to look for it. Otherwise, he will find what he thinks are S&R in some very peculiar places. Before coming to any conclusions about what “works” or “doesn’t work”, and thus does or does not provide an edge, one ought to keep in mind that a given event -- such as price seemingly finding support or resistance at a trendline (or moving average, candlestick, Pivot Point, Fib level or whatever) -- may be only incidental to what is truly providing that support or resistance. A fundamental misunderstanding of how "indicators" are calculated and what they're supposed to do can lead to all sorts of off-task behavior. We think we see the indicators indicating something, or not, and believe we have made an important discovery. We then devote our efforts to improving the hit rate and the probability of whatever it is we think the indicator is indicating when our efforts ought to be focused on determining whether or not the indicator is actually indicating what we think it's indicating. In most if not all cases, it isn't. Consider the virgin being tossed into the volcano: sometimes it results in a great crop, sometimes it doesn't. Maybe tossing her in earlier or later will change the probability of a healthy crop. Maybe two virgins are better than one. Maybe six. Maybe tall virgins are more effective than short ones. And surely age is important. But does the robustness of the crop really have anything to do with tossing the virgin into the volcano in the first place? The money under the pillow is not evidence of the existence of the tooth fairy, and spring will arrive regardless of whether the virgin is tossed into the volcano or not. (Db)
  6. 1 point
    :haha: I hear you say. But really. I think that this is perhaps the single biggest factor in the high failure rate of new traders. Perhaps it would be better put that you should not expect to make money. Let me put it in a different way. A beginner will come into trading and have had very little experience of anything similar. The market will however look familiar somehow and tease them into thinking small successes are down to skill. After all, humans like certainty and are quite happy to congratulate themselves when they think they are good at something. Would you expect to pick up a guitar and then a month or two later be playing at a rock concert? Would you expect to pick up a paintbrush and shortly after have an exhibition on display at the Louvre? Probably not. The difference is though that poor trading costs you your money. Coming into trading, you will be pitted against seasoned professionals, massive hedge funds, banks and computer systems to name but a few. Losses early on affect more than just your bank balance. They affect your emotions and your ability to learn and develop confidence in your understanding of markets and methods you use to trade. If you don't understand how to 'take a loss' this can be catastrophic. Do yourself a favour, when you start trading, trade to trade well, not to make money!
  7. 1 point
    zdo

    ,,,just Sayin...

    Reflexivity So let’s go ‘beyond’ ... Yet if you review his trades, including normal trades and his outlier ‘country killer’ trades, and dig a little bit, rather than developing a knack at ‘narrative trading’ it turns out in each instance he had agents providing inside knowledge previous to the emergence of the situation, and he then spent considerable resources buying influence to manipulate each situation to the trade’s advantage. Rich and famous, he “felt obligated” to write books about it, but (What I’m just sayin’ is) - he is lying in his books. If some permutation of the concepts have not already occurred to someone engaging in narrative trading, the term and concepts of Reflexivity may help one conceptualize narrative trading better and maybe even help to participate more fully in the middle of moves... but they will not help in (instigating) and participating at the beginning... or in pressing and assuring that the outcomes go to extremes ... and the painful truth is many trend traders go broke 'successfully' participating in the middle of moves.
  8. 1 point
    Amadvill

    Quantitative Strategies

    Years ago I did a course dictated by Fernando Martínez Gómez Tejedor who helped me professionally, quantitative strategies, the information is of great relevance and although I do not have it complete I promise to get it to share it. For now I will upload a part and then I will provide you with the information of the complete course, it is in Spanish, you can translate it: Mega Dropbox
  9. 1 point
    ethanscott

    Market Volatility.

    I agree. Share prices change because of supple and demand. If more people want to buy a stock (demand) than sell it (supply), then the price moves up. Conversely, if more people wanted to sell a stock than buy it, there would be greater supply than demand, and the price would fall.
  10. 1 point
    zdo

    Which indicators you like and why

    Noobies, PAn said "Indicators are absolutely worthless" To be more accurate, PAn should have posted "Indicators are absolutely worthless to me." Indicators are like any other measure or representation - worthless if you don’t know how to use them. When I first started trading I studied indicators in depth then moved on... it was not until many years later when I got into automation that indicators and learning how and WHEN to use them became not “absolutely worthless” but extremely valuable. ... PAn, somewhere a noob is in a Price Action thread trying to integrate new material. Someone like you pops up and says “Price action trading is absolutely worthless. Indicators are all I need” . Helpful? No. To really be accurate PAn should have posted nothing at all in this thread...
  11. 1 point
    Gamera

    Testing Times.

    Actions for the 30th.
  12. 1 point
    Hi Folks, I thought it would be interesting if we had a thread where we could all post charts of potential price moves in real time. These do not have to be actual trades you are taking. The purpose would be for us to learn from one another how to recognize these opportunities in real time. Therefore, when you post a chart, be sure to clearly state the direction in which you anticipate price to move, and the reason you are interpreting price action in that manner. This is not a thread for secrets, show-offs, or salespeople selling systems. I'll start off with the GBPUSD here soon after the markets have reopened for trading this Sunday evening. Looks like a potential short trade if there is a break of 1.6421 (For the record, I am not trading this). The first red arrow would have been a nice short entry as the Cable put in a 1-2-3 top per Trader Vic (easy to see after the fact). The second red arrow swas a second chance short entry on the retest of the break of the "2" point on that 1-2-3 top (also easy to see in hindsight). The third red arrow is the current market as price is trying to find support. If that support does not hold, a test of 1.6389 - 1.6406 would be next. I have some family time now, so I'll check in later and update the chart. Best Wishes, Thales
  13. 1 point
    Gamera

    Testing Times.

    Actions for the 16th. Price was choppy and indecisive and I knew it at the time but tried to make something out of nothing, all trades scraped the bottom of the barrel.
  14. 1 point
    Hi traders, how are you? I am just joined here. The community looks beautiful, easy and good structure.
  15. 1 point
    WildPete

    Reading Charts in Real Time

    No trigger on long GBPUSD, pulling Buy Order. God Bless.. WP
  16. 1 point
    Scams have made headlines since the inception of the internet and with the advent of cryptocurrency, the topic is still trendy. The scam in the cryptocurrency space, both recorded and unrecorded continues to multiply on a daily basis with recent updates suggesting that about $9 million is lost daily to cryptocurrency scams. The most popular types include Ponzi schemes, fraud, phishing, initial coin offering (ICO) scams, hacking, fake application, and even theft. Although this is heartbreaking, it is believed that individuals who indulge in this awful activities both the investors and the operators of the schemes are forced to do so by their station and financial status. Cryptocurrency enthusiasts hope that the scams in the industry will be reduced to a minimal level as technology advances rapidly. However, it is clear that with the advancement scams also advances in frequency and sophistication. New strategies to scam investors are devised on a regular basis and the population of individuals who engage in these schemes grows bigger. It is believed that the scams in the cryptocurrency industry are what has set the government of many nations as well as financial institutions and experts against the notion of digital coins. In recent times, financial institutions and even search engines and social media platform have taken active steps to reduce or ban transactions and ICO ads from their platform.Financial experts have also dedicated time and resources to educate investors across the globe of the risk involved in putting cash into digital coins. Meanwhile, the number of investment in this virtual currency continues to multiply. A few financial experts have taken a different stand, stating that investors are not to blame for putting their money into something as uncertain as cryptocurrency investment, rather their impecuniosity should be seen as the culprit. It is true that a substantial proportion of the population has closed to zero investment opportunities. The heat of this situation can be safely blamed when such individual decides to invest in get-rich-quick schemes in the cryptocurrency space or even partake in such activities. For instance, Ponzi schemes promise to reward its investors with a substantial amount of money within a short period of time, which sounds exciting to individuals who tirelessly search for ways to make ends meet. It is believed that the risk in the cryptocurrency space is not half as much as that in the lotto and gambling industry, yet the government legalize it and forbid cryptocurrency transactions. Statistically, it is estimated that about half of United States adult play the lottery, with official lottery data providing that the population who participate in betting regularly is about 3 million in the Republic of Philippines. This a large number and if an average lottery player wages a dollar daily, it will amount to $365 annually, which is a guaranteed net loss. This invariably means the average amount spent on lottery by bettors in the Philippines is the annual amount spent by an individual multiplied by three million which amount to $1.095 billion lost annually. It is important to state that this figure does not include the money spent betting on illegal gambling schemes such as cockfighting and Jueteng where the figure may be quadrupled. Cryptocurrency, on the other hand, is believed to be a risky exercise that offers no guarantee or consumer protection, but this point can be safely argued otherwise. A smart and intelligent cryptocurrency investor can convert a meager capital into a substantial sum of money in the digital coins space, but no matter how disciplined a gambler is, the improbabilities in the betting industry are unimaginable. There are over 800 cryptocurrencies and this number is rapidly increasing on a daily basis. After calculating the possibility of growth and profit, an investor can easily purchase the digital coin he desires to own right from the comfort of his home with no intermediaries or involvement of any governmental or financial institutions. Cryptocurrency investment provides ample unprecedented opportunities for investors. Storing cryptos in vaults or online wallets, waiting for its value to multiply may sound like a child’s play to many financial experts but it is better than the lotto as it gives individuals a total control over their assets. Furthermore, no matter how little your investment or how risky cryptocurrency investment is, a skilled and hardworking person can make substantial returns in no time. New investment opportunities continue to evolve in the cryptocurrency space. This even gets better as digital coins are now easily procured with the development and installation of cryptocurrency automated teller machines (ATM). In March, reports states that two cryptocurrency ATMs where installed in Georgia in other to make the exchange of bitcoins and Litecoins hassle-free with support for Ethereum and Dashcoin expected in the nearest future. Many online stores now allow customers to pay for goods with digital coins with lower fees compared to the traditional currencies. In addition, a new concept known as Bitcoin IRA provides investment opportunities for retirees. It helps to create a cryptocurrency IRA investment account that can be benefited from at retirement. Retirees will only have to pay fewer fees compared to that of the traditional currency plus, they just have to sit and watch their investment grow in the cryptocurrency space. Cryptocoins are rapidly growing in terms of awareness, acceptability, and investments. It can now be used to make payments for products from local and international stores ranging from the purchase of groceries to the management of online contents as well as the procurement of digital assets. Even with the risks, high volatility, scams and hacking activities in the cryptocurrency space, it still provides innumerable investment opportunities for its users and it is believed by many cryptocurrency enthusiasts that this is just the beginning. The industries are projected to grow like wildfire over the next 15 years, providing new investment opportunities and revolutionizing financial institutions in ways that were practically impossible with the traditional currencies. Digital coins provide everybody with equal opportunity to own it and take part in the growth of the industry over a period of time.
  17. 1 point
    Hello traders, I am interested in order flow trading and I will post some trades and predictions, some articles and ideology of a bit different understanding how price moves and why. May be this forum will be the right place. So, for the start I have couple of charts of recent trade on oil. Also I did some comparison of two different software. Would be great to meet some traders who use order flow too. Lets see. I have a lots ideas and strategies to share. I don't use any traditional indicators, because just numbers are important for me.
  18. 1 point
    What I've learned so far that you really should have a record of what you've done on the market. Not necessary every position and detail, but the outcome, mindset and the triggers of your actions. This way you can examine your motivation behind following a plan or a gut feeling etc. This way you won't only have numbers, but the documentation of what was going on in your mind while you made a given trade.
  19. 1 point
    Eavoldisely

    10 Rules to Successfully Read Stock.

    Stock trading is less risky than the forex trading but it has slow returns due to less liquidity. If you are a patient and long-term trader then stocks are the best option for you to trade in. Am I right in this regard? Stay blessed stock lovers!
  20. 1 point
    Jason Solomon

    Which indicators you like and why

    I use Fib tool+moving average combo and RSI most often. But have plenty more to experiment with :P
  21. 1 point
    Guess I would add to have a trading journal. Which helps you have a better understanding of the other rules and help closing out emotions.
  22. 1 point
    Donald

    prasadreddy

    Hi, welcome to the forum! I can recommend you the Introduction Topic Have fun and hope we can be at your help!
  23. 1 point
    Oh you have! Glad you liked it, and good luck to us then. I have learned a lot from them so far. Be patient and keep learning!
  24. 1 point
    It depends on the person that how he can manage his skills with trading and learning the basic with a demo or any other way. We can suggest them but after all, learning is the procedure which takes time.
  25. 1 point
    Im a beginner trader and just wanted to say hi. Ive bin trading with a real account for about 6 months now strictly in stocks. Practiced on a simulated account for about a year off and on and i must say the difference is like black and white, I did far better on my simulated account. Hoping for better times ahead.
  26. 1 point
    Hello everyone! I am very new to this forum. I find this forum really interesting because of the community here is really active and they respond to the thread accordingly. I am really excited to share you guys my thoughts, knowledge, and experience in trading. Happy trading everyone!
  27. 1 point
    A TRUE LIFE STORY OF A VETERAN TRADER We were in a midst of a popular monthly traders’ forum when an elderly man on a wheelchair was helped into the hall. The moderator asked us to stand up for the man, whom he called “a soldier on the battlefield of the financial markets.” As the forum was about to be concluded, someone suggested that we allow the professional on a wheelchair to give a short speech. A mic was given to him. He held the mic and said: “My fellow traders. Thank you for standing up for me, and thank you for giving me a privilege to talk in this forum. I started trading 12 years ago. And I am still trading. I will trade for as long as I breathe. I am one of the most popular Forex traders in this country. Sadly, the one who coached me for Forex trading stopped trading in 2008, because of subprime crises and market crashes. He lacked risk control skills. I pressed on, to become a regular columnist in a popular newspaper, writing about Forex trading on daily basis. I also provided trading signals for people, as well as trading my personal accounts. I have 2 powerful manual strategies that I use. I developed the strategies based on my many years of experience. Trainees who apply my strategies have been sharing wonderful testimonies since. A few years ago, I fell ill. Diagnosis revealed that I had cancer of the bone marrow. I required surgery in a foreign hospital. I gathered all the funds I could gather, and well-wishers and friends also contributed what they could. I was transported to a foreign country (I was already paralyzed). Luckily, the surgery was successful. I can say, partially successful, for the paralysis was partially corrected. I can now speak and use my hands. I can also stand up, but I cannot walk. While I was on a hospital bed and my legs were tied. I was trading profitably on mobile devices. I was even providing trading signals and mentorship to people online. Then, a client couldn’t believe I was providing services to clients on a hospital bed until we connected on Skype, doing video calls. I was seen trading on a bed, while I was strapped to the bed. Several months ago, I came back to my country, and I have continued trading, training and providing signals since then. [He burst into tears]. Traders. Let me tell you this. Online trading remains the best tool for financial freedom. Please do anything possible to become a winning trader. Look at my condition now. I am advanced in age. I can only stand up, but I cannot walk. I need crutches and a wheelchair to move about. Imagine. If I was someone who did 9.00 A.M – 5.00 P.M. work, what would be my lot now? My employers would have laid me off. If I was fortunate enough to get anything from them, it could have been exhausted by now. I would have become a beggar by now. Or what makes me special when compared to other handicapped persons who have now become beggars? Clearly, online trading makes the difference! Imagine. If I go to Mr. Henry to beg for $30, I would finish spending it. If I go to Mr. Johnson to beg for $20, I would finish spending it. If Mr. Johnson was kind enough to give me $20 three times. He would eventually stop giving me more money because he got his own responsibilities. He might not pick my calls again; or he would instruct his folks to tell me he is not at home, when I visit him next (to beg for money). This is a lesson you must learn. Please learn from my story. I trade on a wheelchair, and I make money from signals provision, coaching and trading. I can sustain myself, my wife, my 3 kids and my aged mother.” He dropped the mic. And the forum ended. I conclude this articles with the 3 quotes below: “You must be disciplined in following the plan of your trade religiously. Once you have closed your position, you should record everything about the trade. Write down where you wanted to enter the trade, what you expected out of the trade, and what you actually did get out of the trade. Make sure to include notes that will help you learn from the trade, reasoning what actually took place once you entered the trade. Explain why the trade was a winner or a loser. If you keep detailed records, you can learn from past trades and increase your chances of recognizing your strengths and weaknesses. Build on your strengths and stay away from trades you have demonstrated weakness in.” – Andy Jordan (Source: Tradingeducators.com) “Humans are an error based machine, we make mistakes and perfection is never really on our radar despite our best efforts. The realisation that mistakes are at the core of good trading is hard for many to accept as they are locked into the belief that you cannot make money if you get trades wrong. Fortunately there is no nexus between making money and being right. Many, many years ago i discovered that the fewer fucks I gave the more I made. To revert to a past life choice of mine – you could never be a fighter if your expectation was that you would never be hit.” – Chris Tate “Avoid illiquid markets. Be sure to check volume. How much is it on average and is it steady day after day. And perhaps the greatest lesson of all should you happen to leap before you look--never, ever trade on hope or stay in a trade based on hope. If you are wrong, get out. If you don't have the discipline to do that, you shouldn't be trading.” – Joe Ross
  28. 1 point
    zak.gibb

    Forex Trading on Smartphone / Iphone

    I've been using my iPhone 7 since the release of this phone. So I was trading for about a year now, and I never had a problem using my broker's mobile platform.
  29. 1 point
    mitsubishi

    ,,,just Sayin...

    Bush- 'Near perfect' Meaning- 98% useless A 95% success rate was claimed at the time, with then President George Bush claimingthat the Patriot's record was "near perfect". Over the following year however, the US Army lowered this estimate to 79% over Saudi Arabian skies and 40% over Israel. A later report by the General Accounting Office concluded that Patriot missiles destroyed only 9% of the Scuds they attempted to engage. The Israeli Defense Force calculated the hit rate at just 2%. https://russia-insider.com/en/major-fail-why-most-those-tomahawks-never-hit-their-targets-syria/ri23177 Scroll down to the photo if you want to see what the pigs in Animal Farm look like these days. These guys actually make the Nazis look pretty. Dumb, ugly, braindead fuckheads. Probably the gayest psychos in all of world history. Still, if you need to spend billions of dollars on murdering innocent defensless citizens, then these are the go to experts.
  30. 1 point
    zdo

    Why Buy Trading Education?

    Thanks for the text. We would appreciate a post. Here’s a sample (of size, not quality ). By the time you are ‘mature’ (maturity can come at any age) enough to trade, you have typically completed standardized ‘education’ and should drop the model asap. In other words, conventional education model will not be effective for learning in trading and seeking a general education in trading, whether curriculum based or not, is a waste of time and of whatever costs are incurred. Instead, anyone ready for trading should also be ready for SELF education. Basically , to really thrive as a trader, I blve you move beyond the currently failing ‘educational’ paradigm founded on the premise that humans can only make sense of the world via communication with each other. On the objective knowledge front that means seeking out only the specific information about instruments, data, exchanges, transactions, orders, etc etc you personally need to fill gaps in your understanding. The beginning trader typically only has about 3 really (seemingly) ‘stupid‘ questions. Ask them. Get it over with. The rest of things are easy to access and learn. You don’t need no fkn ‘education’ in it. On the ‘sychological’ front, that means studying the opportunities and limitations of your own neurological and temperamental tendencies, your sympathetic and parasympathetic balance and tendencies, your own limbic system, and the degrees to which you are susceptible to each trading ‘bias’ (see Daniel Kahneman, etc.)..., your desires and what you do with them, etc. etc. It takes deep self-study. Reading about, taking courses, or even getting degrees in psychology won’t help you a fkn bit. On the methods front, that means getting in the cockpit and getting real experience with real money so you will actually learn what methods best suit your true nature. Do that before any outside training. Once you have almost mastered your method then you will also know what exactly what you need to work on. Get sufficient experience in your own best method(s), then seek an expert in that method for further increases in leverage. With trading educators there is no transference of ability or capacity. As I’ve said many times now, a teacher can never really teach you his method because there is simply too much differences between your perceptual maps and cognitive processes and his. He will be unconsciously competent at things that he will never be able to ‘share’ with you, etc etc. Wycoff could not teach you wycoff, etc. Their students can certainly not teach you wycoff, elliot, whoever. etc. Trust serendipity / synchronicity -"when the student is ready, the teacher will appear". ‘Education’ becomes a useless relic. The ‘voice of trading’ IS trading education that says you need to move more and more into just running scripts instead of ‘playing’ at trading ‘creatively’ . If you think you’re the special exception that can pull off changing yourself to match up with a ‘system’, which likely you do if you’re reading this, go for it - odds be damned. Fail forward as fast as you can. Maybe then you’ll realize you need to get beyond ‘education’. Maybe it will dawn on you that the ‘voice of trading’ has vast areas that nothing is allowed to be spoken about. But, YOU need not to wait until old ‘voice of trading’ deteriorates completely and new media, etc. emerges. Sorry I don’t have time to be queer this up or make it gender indeterminate for our precious ‘student’ snowflakes... or to be very respectful. Bluntly - if you have to be ‘educated’, you’re not ready to trade.
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
    No seller coming on oil. Buyers building long positions.
  33. 1 point
    CrazyCzarina

    Yea I'm a Starter

    First, there's no short-cut. Either commit to spending hundreds of hours developing professional skills or don't begin at all. If it was easy, we'd all be millionaires.
  34. 1 point
    johnnydaymon

    TTM Wave a B C Indicator Code

    Here you go Derek !, the function and A,B,C Function - mbC.txt TTM Wave A.txt TTM Wave B.txt TTM Wave C.txt
  35. 1 point
    Atti2dTrader

    Reading Charts in Real Time

    NZDUSD reached its profit target. Best, AT
  36. 1 point
    daveyjones

    Trading for a Living

    You can't reinvest everything you make. Eventually, you will need to take money out of your trading accounts and pay bills, take your family on vacation, etc. But how often and how much should you transfer from your trading accounts to your personal accounts? Should you take out a fixed amount each month or a percentage of your earnings? What if your accounts are currently sitting lower than your opening balance? Should you wait until you move above that point before you reward yourself with a salary?
  37. 1 point
    I wanted a simple trading plan to follow. I thought I had one. The problem was It didn’t work as well as it should., Leaving aside the patience/discipline type issues what are we left with? Too much, that’s what we’re left with. At some point I began to realise that there were several useful character traits that I was not only failing to utilize, I was actively suppressing them. Does suppressing something, anything, sound like healthy activity to you? “try not to ‘fix’ it” I’m going to shock a few guys here. I have to tell you that after all these years I still don’t have a system that compels me to enter here, exit there. Did you notice the key word in that sentence? That’s because I’m not a rule based trader. I’m a trader. The rules are there to help me, not get in my way. OK, so now more experienced readers know (or think they know) where this is going- Discretionary Trading. A no go area for many. A big scary taboo subject that a lot of vested interests would like you to stay the hell away from. The scarecrows of the vendor industry prefer empty cliché’s like ‘Plan your trade, trade your plan’ Well, you’re going to find that difficult for a long time. The thing about scarecrows is they’re rooted to the spot. And the danger is you might get rooted there as well. The scarecrows have got a song they like to sing. In fact they’ve only got one song, it’s called The Gospel- A Traders Bible. And every line in that song is every cliché you ever heard. And the chorus goes like this: 90% of traders lose. I know most of you are hell bent on dotting all the eyes and crossing all the tees in your trading plan and a rule for every eventuality. The whole industry just loves it when you do that., you know why? because they can package something to cater for that desire. Next time you miss your entry by 1 tic and price takes off without you.. try not to ’fix’ it. Let’s call your trading plan -a sword, and the market -the battle. If every time your sword gets blunted in battle you feel compelled to go back to the drawing board and sharpen it, be aware that there’s a point beyond that process. What I’m saying is, there comes a time when the sword gets sharper in battle than it can ever be made on the drawing board. What do you do when you break one of your trading rules (yet again) and you lose money? 1- Put a little note on your trading screen: “Must remember to follow the rules no matter what” 2-’Improve’ the rules. 3- Take a closer look at someone else’s rules. 4- Take a closer look inside your head. You’ll probably have to work through that list in chronological order and get to number 4 before you can even put yourself in thinking outside the box mode. How do you know when you’re ready to go beyond? When you can swim, there’s not much point in staying in the shallow end. I was ready when I realised my discretionary decision making was working better than going back to the drawing board. My learning curve had taken longer because I thought I was being disciplined by not making discretionary decisions, when in fact, that belief was holding me back. The Key Point Here Not every trader should be making discretionary decisions, certainly not a new trader. You won’t have anywhere near enough experience to do it. But if it takes you 2 years to realise that it might become part of your trading plan, then that’s 2 years where you could have been working towards it. Here’s the biggest reason why ‘discretionary’ might be a no go area for you. You designed your trading plan with the express intent of ruling yourself as a trader out of the equation. You decided from the very start to be the passenger instead of the pilot. The key reason why discretionary worked for me was that I realised that my trading strategies were very compatible with me being the pilot…. or co-pilot if you like. A happy coincidence you might think. But I suspect that it was no coincidence. I suspect it might have something to do with having a certain personality trait- resistance to rigidly imposed, inflexible rules. If an aircraft is in trouble, who’s got the best chance of safely landing the plane, the passenger or the pilot? See 4 above- Take a closer look inside your head. Then take a look at trading 101. Don’t wait 2 years to realise you got it the wrong way round. Next- Discretionary Trading isn’t anything like you think it is. Actually, you and a lot of others who won’t admit it are doing it too. The biggest traders in the world make discretionary decisions. Today, as a usefool mental exercise I'll be counting from 649 backwards to the number 2.
  38. 1 point
    The longer one lives, the more one realises that most people don't know what they're talking about. The longer one trades, the more one realises that most 'traders' don't know what they're talking about.. If you've traded successfully any time between March 2009 to the present day you've done really well. But you've never traded through a bear market. People who believe that 1-2 years is what it takes are kidding themselves and giving false hope to others. People who think like that won't be around to talk out of the back of their head come the next major correction or the next bear market. People who have traded 1-2 years oughta STFU and worry more about how they are gonna survive the next 1-2 years. There's a difference between making money and always being able to make money. Same as there's a difference between those who trade and those who call themselves coaches while they publicly admit to making rookie mistakes.( You know who you are and why you're on my twat list) A difference between those who trade and those who write articles full of generic useless crap advice.It's almost impossible for a real trader to write crap. A difference between those who trade and those who write articles full of generic useless crap to generate customers. The last thing most real traders want is customers. My advice to beginners is forget it. You have to be a certain type of person to succeed. Maybe consider doing it as a sideline, don't do what I did, don't let it consume your whole life unless you're that type. Don't kid yourself that you're the 'type' just 'cos you want to quit the rat race. Or because you have a high IQ or because the neighbour does it and if he can, you can. Or because you paid $6000 for a seminar.. or 100 other reasons. There's only 3 things that count- Sheer bloody minded persistence Time served The ability to become someone else when you're trading. - Hence the bullshit advice about finding a trading style that fits your personality. The only trading style that counts is one that makes money. There's a trading style for- wreckless people impatient people obstinate people people who think they're smarter than the market. people who think there's a short cut I can be impatient and obstinate at times, just not when I'm trading. I back tested my personality to see what worked and what didn't There's a price for everything and the price for trading for an income is pretty steep in terms of time- forget money, any intelligent person can get money, but you can't get the time back. Then there's the reality that nobody in your life, including your family has the slightest interest in what you do. I have a brother who resented me when I was failing and resents me even more now. Most people think the market is a casino full of crooks and people who make money by contributing nothing to society. You can't really blame them can you?. If you succeed nobody is pleased about it except you. Nobody will know what you had to go through or appreciate how difficult it was- except another trader There's a story I'm reminded of about Richie Blackmore that Jon Lord tells. They're coming out of the dressing room to play a show ( Rainbow, not Deep Purple). As they go down the corridor Lord realises he's talking to himself and he turns round to see Blackmore is having a mini breakdown " I can't stand this anymore, I just want to go home" You think I'm talking about a losing trade? I'm not even taliking about the trades. In terms of mental effort there is zero difference between a winning/losing trade. I do this 'cos I'm driven to do this, because there's nothing else I want to do. And that's a form of self imposed prison. Is there anyone in a prison who doesn't want to escape? So why don't I stop and go do something else? Because I'd only go and build another prison somewhere else. Because I'm that type, because I'm not Bob. An ex girlfriend years ago had a friend Julie and her husband Bob. "Bob works in a factory and only earns £250 a week" "Yeah, but they're happy and Bob goes home at 4pm and doesn't work weekends. I got customers, employees and 10 hour days and wondering where the next contract is coming from..." So, I'm in a much better prison now- no employees or customers..... hmmm not so bad after all.
  39. 1 point
    First of all I am not an amateur, having obtained an education in this area... The idea that people "engage" in self destructive behaviors is (as with most things that people post here) is misleading....generally people simple LET events overtake them, OR they are unwilling to accept responsibility for behaviors that produce a negative result, because they are too lazy (pure and simple)..to do the hard work of correcting themselves... The fact is that life in general is a struggle, and those of us who have made it to adulthood figure it out at the appropriate time (late teens, early 20's) and adopt an adult appropriate view of the world. The rest fall along a continuum where they may or may not possess a realistic adult view of the world, AND as a result of that immature world view, they believe (wholeheartedly) that the world "owes them" certain things.....then "when not if" the world doesn't cooperate" its NOT their fault....ITS EVERYONE ELSE..... Although its not politically correct, I believe these folks should get a brisk kick in the ass (or perhaps join the military and have someone else apply a "brisk kick in the ass" to them) until they "get it".... The subject is near and dear to my heart because sites like this one attract adult children like magnets (all asking the same questions over and over)...."why do so many traders (fill in the space) blah blah blah... And for the person who suggests that "all animals" do this....ah no....you see in the animal kingdom, "engaging" in self destructive behavior results in their DESTRUCTION.....there is an Darwinian process that prevents that kind of behavior from continuing along a genetic line.
  40. 1 point
    Mysticforex

    38 Steps to Becoming a Trader

    I didn't see this posted here anywhere so I thought I would. The " I Look Back Now " thread inspired me. I read this several years ago in a commodities magazine, I have also seen it around on the web: 38 steps to becoming a trader They are as follows: 1. We accumulate information - buying books, going to seminars and researching. 2. We begin to trade with our 'new' knowledge. 3. We consistently 'donate' and then realise we may need more knowledge or information. 4. We accumulate more information. 5. We switch the commodities we are currently following. 6. We go back into the market and trade with our 'updated' knowledge. 7. We get 'beat up' again and begin to lose some of our confidence. Fear starts setting in. 8. We start to listen to 'outside news' and to other traders. 9. We go back into the market and continue to 'donate'. 10. We switch commodities again. 11. We search for more information. 12. We go back into the market and start to see a little progress. 13. We get 'over-confident' and the market humbles us. 14. We start to understand that trading successfully is going to take more time and more knowledge than we anticipated. MOST PEOPLE WILL GIVE UP AT THIS POINT, AS THEY REALISE WORK IS INVOLVED. 15. We get serious and start concentrating on learning a 'real' methodology. 16. We trade our methodology with some success, but realise that something is missing. 17. We begin to understand the need for having rules to apply our methodology. 18. We take a sabbatical from trading to develop and research our trading rules. 19. We start trading again, this time with rules and find some success, but over all we still hesitate when we execute. 20. We add, subtract and modify rules as we see a need to be more proficient with our rules. 21. We feel we are very close to crossing that threshold of successful trading. 22. We start to take responsibility for our trading results as we understand that our success is in us, not the methodology. 23. We continue to trade and become more proficient with our methodology and our rules. 24. As we trade we still have a tendency to violate our rules and our results are still erratic. 25. We know we are close. 26. We go back and research our rules. 27. We build the confidence in our rules and go back into the market and trade. 28. Our trading results are getting better, but we are still hesitating in executing our rules. 29. We now see the importance of following our rules as we see the results of our trades when we don't follow the rules. 30. We begin to see that our lack of success is within us (a lack of discipline in following the rules because of some kind of fear) and we begin to work on knowing ourselves better. 31. We continue to trade and the market teaches us more and more about ourselves. 32. We master our methodology and our trading rules. 33. We begin to consistently make money. 34. We get a little over-confident and the market humbles us. 35. We continue to learn our lessons. 36. We stop thinking and allow our rules to trade for us (trading becomes boring, but successful) and our trading account continues to grow as we increase our contract size. 37. We are making more money than we ever dreamed possible. 38. We go on with our lives and accomplish many of the goals we had always dreamed of. Most traders will identify with this list and should be able to place themselves within these steps. Keep in mind that very few people progress through these steps in an orderly fashion. Developing your trading skills is an iterative process. For example, you may reach Step 13., find that although you were making money, your basic premise for trading was flawed (you might have been benefiting from the bull market, rather than your own trading prowess and then have been rudely awakened when the market entered a bear phase) and you may drop back to Step 4. and start 'climbing' the steps again. Having the proper mindset, attitude and psychological makeup becomes increasingly important as you progress through the steps. The focus of the earlier steps is on external issues, i.e. developing proficiency in the mechanics of trading while the focus of the latter steps (particularly from Step 30, on) is on internal issues, i.e. improving ourselves mentally and psychologically, maturing as traders.
  41. 1 point
    WHY?

    Beyond Taylor

    I think you may be confusing some issues here. Taylor believed the market to be manipulated over a 3 day period. During that 3 day period there would be opportunities for two type of actions. 1) Going long and selling that long position 2) Shorting and cover that short position. For instance, you can take advantage of action number 1 above on three occasions: Low made first on a buy day. In this case you sell the long on the next day or same day if you are daytrading. The next occasion for going long and selling that long was on a Day 2 of the cycle i.e. a SELL if early in the session a low is made below the low of the previous day (which would be a buy day) then you go LONG and sell that long on any good rally back to or through the low of the previous day (low of that buy day). You must complete this action the same day and not hold overnight. The third opportunity for action number 1 is on a BUY day say it doesn't trade down very well at all but near the end of the day it has held a higher low than that of the previous day (ss day) then you can take a long position. This is called buying a higher bottom on BUY day. Taylor says it is usually profitable. But generally you would hold this position until a decline starts which could be the next day or even the followoing SS day. In summary, I have just described to you 3 times which Taylor espoused taking and a long position and selling it over the course of the 3 day cycle. You can't just simply fit the actions into phases and call it a shorting phase or a long phase. Why is this? Well I have just explained that there are two long opportunies presented on the buy day and one long opportunity presented on the Sell day. You take every which one actually works out in the market. Now look at shorting opportunities. Taylor says you can short a high made first early in the session on a buy day and cover it the same day. You can short also on a SS day on a high made first and cover the same day or the next day. Look at my post #216 again. It was a buy day. It closed high on the previous day. That means that odds favored a decline in the next trading session (buy day 4-2). Therefore, I was looking to employ action # 2 above FIRST on this buy day. That is, I was looking to short on a decline made first then reverse and go long on action number one, occasion number 1, mentioned above. That is, I was anticipating the market being to be taken down first on the buy day 4-2 (why? well because it closed high on the previous day). Then I was anticipating a market reversal thus giving me an opportunity to cover my short and to take a long opportunity per occasion #1 under action number #1. Maybe I haven't confused the issue even more for you. In summary you can't just divide it up into a shorting phase and a long phase. You can go long or short on the very same BUY day. There are no shorting phases and buying phases. There are only shorting opportunties and buying opportunities and they are multiple and they occur over the three day cycle.There are no mini campaigns. There are only shorting and long opportunities over a 3 day period. Hope this explanation helps.
  42. 1 point
    WHY?

    Beyond Taylor

    You are welcome. I have never tried adapting Taylor that way but my guess would be that it may work. I have just never been interested in investing in long term trends. I have adapted his method on intraday charts and seen some promising stuff down to 15 minute charts. Perhaps there is an element of human nature (as markets do reflect that) and perhaps Taylor discovered a manifestation of that in a 3 day cycle senario. Humphrey Neil in Tape reading and Market tactics said "the ticker tape is simply a record of human nature passing in review". I suppose if it does record human nature on a minute by minute basis it would also on a 5 min chart...15 minute..daily..or weekly..even monthly. The old timers of course read the tape from a ticker machine which served pretty much the same as a time and sales screen of this age but on a much slower basis. However, what I find interesting when these old timers discuss tape reading they do it from a chart and use a chart to show examples. Therefore, that makes me think; can the tape be read from a chart? That is, can the chart be considered a useful, grafical, representation of the ticker tape/time and sales and in itself be called "the tape". I decided it was so. Therefore, I call this classical tape reading. It really isn't the way they "read" the tape in those days but it is the way they "explained" the tape. See, if the ticker machine and time and sales can be seen as small increments of the tape why couldn't the tape be seen in a larger way such as a chart. After all, the chart is a representation of the ticker/time and sales. Cliff Drokes thought along these same lines and mentioned it in his book tape reading for the 21st century. A quick look at the old timers. Neil, Gann, Wycoff..their explanations of the tape were done in chart form. Actually, Tom Williams work does the same thing. It is reading the tape in the form of charts looking for institutional activity. So anyway, when I refer to reading the tape in some of my posts I mean all the way from the time and sales/DOM/Orderflow to a hybrid version of reading the tape from charts. Of course, the DOM/Orderflow/time and sale is basically meaningless when you are talking about a trend of several weeks. Gann (in The Truth of the Stock Market Tape) read and explained the tape for these sort of longer trends from a chart. The time and sale/DOM/orderflow have gotton so fast now days (unlike the ticker tape of days gone by) that with algos and all the HFT out there the tape moves faster and faster (even at a nano second level) that the human eye cannot pick it up. Some daytraders/scalpers have taken to using computers to help them read them tape and stitch back up big orders that have been broken up to hide footprints..etc. However, in the final analysis the product of the tape volume/price shows up on a chart. So, I have taken to reading the tape from the charts. I say all this about tape reading because it is my belief that to be able to use Taylor properly it will require not just a knowledge of the cycles ..etc... but also a knowledge of how to read the tape from a chart. That is how one is going to conclude if a decline has stopped at a probable Taylor Low or a Taylor High has been reached. Or failed to reach it. It helps one to anticipate failures to penetrate previous days cycles and stopping point for declines and rallies. Just calculating the average of Taylors decline/rallies...coupled with the three day cycle theory etc isn't enough to get the job done. I know this to be so. Taylor himself mentioned several times about reading the tape so I know that he did so in conjunction with all his analysis and averages and figures. He basically clocked the market like one would clock a slot machine but his final pull from the trigger came from tape reading. That is why for years I have talked about in my Taylor posts when I say my entry here or exit there depends on the tape. Most folks never catch it or maybe they don't understand the tape? That is why I listed those books in my pompous post as my intent was to give some resources to folks where they could learn about tape reading from what I call a classical view i.e. a chart. IT IS THE FINE TUNING OF THE TAYLOR METHODOLOGY. Trust me Taylor will only work well if one can read the tape for entries. On less than ideal day cycles one will miss the trend if they can't read the tape. Take my last Taylor chart (I refer you to post #216 and the post #212 anticipating the price action of #216). It was an ideal Taylor taylor BUY day. The market is taken down overnight for a shorting opportunity and I said that was what I was looking and I expected it in the night session (re-read my post #212..this was made before the fact). Then, when the day session started we had the reversal and a chance to go long and make a killing. But notice something here. The low didn't make it to the taylor projected low of 3-30 1395.75 or 1394.56.... my softaware forecast. The reversal came. If I couldn't read the tape and see that the reversal was here then I would have waited around for the market to make the Taylor projected low and I would have missed the move up. So, it was an ideal Taylor BUY day in terms of the Taylor Strategy (look to short and go long) and the direction (take the market down then back up early in the session) BUT it WAS NOT an ideal Taylor BUY day in terms of the projected low. Nor in terms of the projected high. My software projected a high of 1406.19 when the actually high after that great rally was 1419.75. Nothing but tape reading would have kept me in the Taylor moves for that day in spite of the facts that the direction being right and the short/long opportunities being righ (as not all Taylor buy days give a short/long opportunity.) This is a long way around the block to answer your question but me thinks it may be relevant to your question. So........ It is possible there could be a 3 week cycle? Or a 3 month cycle? Me thinks it is possible but then again tape reading, in the sense that I am discussed above,..well...it will be necessary as the time/sale/dom/ will be totally irrelevant to a 3 week cycle. You will have to use the sort of tape reading I am talking about. As much as some people don't like Tom Williams and VSA he did have alot of good stuff that is useful for tape reading. Wiliams is good too in the sense that this sort of tape reading I am talking about requires an analysis of the spread. The size of the spread says alot about the tape. The volume of trading on that spread size says alot too. We have volume and we have price and price spread and open and closing. I have never understood why pure price action people want to leave out that piece of important data, namely, volume. It tells how the price was made. And indicates the value of the price in terms of money and money is what moves the market. You and I don't move the markets. Institutions move the markets. And their foot print is the volume. Anyway I better shut up about volume. I will say two more things about volume. To read the tape like I talk about in this post one will have to take volume into consideration. The second thing is IF anything is a leading indicator it is VOLUME. I ahve nothing like it that helps me better detect probable future price action. Of course it can be wrong sometimes simply because institutions can be wrong sometimes. And institutions are battling out with each other and they all approach the market in their own way. One institution may start aggressive buying and that pushes the price up when a stronger one beings shorting and wins out. Either way the story is told in the tape (chart). And so much faking out goes on. Make the market look weak to drive down a few ticks so they can really buy at a discount price because their real plan is to take the market up. As much as some don't like Gann his book I mentioned it as being useful and especially Drokes book. Also,Silver mentioned Neils book which I had somehow left out but yes, it is important too. Why don't you make some books up on on these longer time frames and let us know what you find out? For those that are interested in extreme scalping based on tape reading the order flow and using a computer to do so can take a look at jigsaw trading. Google it. I have absolutely nothing to do with jigsaw so please mitt don't think that. I mention them as a resource only. For trading order flow from DOM look at NO BS Trading by John Grady. However, this sort of tape reading is very short-term and for scalping and isn't relevant to Taylor trading. It can be somewhat useful for scalping via Brooks methods if one likes to scalp and take longer Taylor positions also like I like to do. Hope all this makes sense. Probally won't be back for a bit. Why?
  43. 1 point
    smmatrix

    Best Automated Trading Platform

    There's no future with those automated trading systems. They are made by marketers to grab your money, not by traders. Trading is hard work. Trading is an art which must be mastered over time. In all my trading years, I have seen many automated systems. They all crash and burn at some point, however, there were two systems that showed promise... They had huge drawdowns which exceeded 45%. That's a deal killer for me as my maximum allowed DD is 15%. It's best to learn how to trade "manually" first, as a profitable trader for several years, before you consider automation. Just sayin' My two centavos.
  44. 1 point
    The problem is Tradewinds, when people start out they really are not in the position to make a sensible judgement on whether or not their strategy is effective and viable. You'll get a younger guy maybe being a bit rash or perhaps an older person who's been successful in other pursuits come in thinking they will figure it out. Well that just isn't the way it is generally. Good point about the commitments and responsibilities btw.
  45. 1 point
    Cory2679

    Joke of The Day!

    The CIA had an opening for an assassin. After all of the background checks, interviews, and testing were done there were three finalists — two men and one woman. For the final test, the CIA agents took one of the men to a large metal door and handed him a gun. "We must know that you will follow your instructions, no matter what the circumstances. Inside this room you will find your wife sitting in a chair. You have to kill her.” The first man said, “You can’t be serious. I could never shoot my wife." The agent replies, “Then you’re not the right man for this job." The second man was given the same instructions. He took the gun and went into the room. All was quiet for about five minutes. Then the agent came out with tears in his eyes. “I tried, but I can’t kill my wife.” The agent replies, “You don’t have what it takes. Take your wife and go home.” Finally, it was the woman’s turn. Only she was told to kill her husband. She took the gun and went into the room. Shots were heard, one shot after another. They heard screaming, crashing, banging on the walls. After a few minutes, all was quiet. The door opened slowly and there stood the woman. She wiped the sweat from her brow and said, “You guys didn’t tell me the gun was loaded with blanks. I had to beat him to death with the chair.”
  46. 1 point
    TraderWill

    Trading for a Living

    Daveyjones, this is a great topic. If you've been trading for a while you know that there's a lot of hype about the fortunes you can make by trading for a living. The reality is that like every job or business it is a process of gradual growth. And if you know people who've started their own business, you'll know that they lived like paupers for years, building their business to the point where they could reap the rewards by paying themselves a decent salary. It's the same with trading for living. If you have a profitable system, you first need to build your trading account so that you can increase the number of shares, contracts or lots that you trade. You also need to have an idea of how much you need or want to withdraw from your account on a monthly or quarterly basis, that becomes essentially the salary you want to receive. Once you trade enough shares, contracts or lots so that your account grows on average more per month or quarter than what you want to pay yourself as a salary, then you can start pulling money out of it. But not before. You want to be in the position that even after your periodic withdrawals the trading account continues to grow, albeit more slowly. Depending on the initial size of your trading account, and on the profitability of your system, you may have to build your account for one or two years before you can start pulling money out of it. It can be done, but not as fast as some would have you believe. Of course the larger your starting account and the smaller your salary requirements, the faster the process.
  47. 1 point
    atto

    Trading The Wyckoff Way

    In the Hinges thread, I posted a live trade and elaborated on my exit methodology. To keep that topic on topic and to allow us to continue investigating exits and scale-outs, I thought it would be a good idea to start a new thread. I'll cover my personal exit methodology seen though Wyckoff ideas, as well as the logical rationale behind it. That said, I welcome all feedback and supporting/opposing opinions. My current trading methodology involves position adds and scale-outs. My reasoning has roots in wagering ideologies such as the Kelly criterion. The idea is simple: Bet more when you have greater odds. Relating to trading, you want the most exposure when your edge is greatest; similarly, you want less exposure when your edge is least (and ideally, no exposure when you have no edge). This makes logical sense, but many traders (myself included for a while) failed to see this. Trading is a game of making money, not proving yourself correct. I disagree with the "A good exit is another entry" camp, because I can't say that my edge is always the same. Yes, if you're able to nail moves completely, then keep your all-in / all-out approach. I personally can't, and don't currently know of any trader who can. Let's examine when a trading edge changes. Let's say you enter with a long setup (and many are discussed in this forum), and price moves in your direction but fails to break through a possible resistance area. Couldn't we argue that the new sellers, by confirming resistance, have taken (at least some of) your bullish edge away? This would be a good area to take some position off, because buying pressure is (momentarily) outmatched by selling pressure. I find volume especially important in these areas, because it can help you gauge the interest of the bulls and bears. Price stalled; did: a) sellers sweep in, or b) buyers simply take a break? If you see a rise of volume on the rejection, start looking for the door. What if price did not stall at possible resistance? Then I see no reason to lighten the position. The buyers have been winning, and sellers didn't step in as they did before. In fact, I have position adding setups based on moves like this. Remember, price moves in waves (not bars) and is fractal. The setup you took on a 1m chart could parlay into a 5m setup. Always pay attention to the market on a greater scale. My most reliable and accurate way to exit are climaxes. Here's how I define a climax: A rise in momentium (volatility), along with: A rise in volume Then, a contraction of momentum / volatility (or, a rejection of price) High volume does not mean there's a climax. In fact, some of the biggest moves are on high volume. It's the rejection / stall you're looking for. High volume gives you a head's up that there's a lot of interest. Once you spend screen time watching climaxes, you can catch them pretty quickly. Frequently, you'll see a quick decay of volume. This generally means that buying pressure has lessened, but sellers have not taken over. Many times, this is the making of a pullback before a continuation. If, however, you see volume gaining on the pullback, you might be looking at a reversal (or a pullback on a larger scale). It's not volume you're interested in directly, but volume's effect on price. You'll also see times when volume does not spike before the exhaustion, but price fails to break through a support/resistance level. Many times, price will try more than once, but new buyers/sellers are simply not interested. This is another good scale out opportunity, because the lack of buying pressure is important. Price could likely continue, but our edge not as much as it was when we had buying pressure on our side. So far, I've talked about exits that are pretty close to the extremes. Unfortunately, not ever price action move ends so cleanly with a climax or S/R confirmation. This is where stop management comes into play. To begin with, I use very small stops initially (so importantly, am willing to re-enter if my entry was not clean). Additionally, there's no reason to take a full stop if price is not confirming your entry premise. This is important. I am not saying to wait for the trade to be proven wrong. Rather, get out if you're not proven right. The Phantom of the Pits has some wise words on this topic. So, we're in a profitable trade, and need to manage stops. My first goal is to make the trade riskless (move the stop to break even). This has many psychological and $ implications. Yes, at times, you can get shaken out for break even, and zoom!.. price shoots off. You must be willing for this to happen, and often, re-enter quickly without chasing a trade. I make the trade riskless as soon as price confirms my entry premise. This often involves a x point move, or a breaking of previous S/R. From there, I manually trail stops as price keeps breaking past S/R levels, or establishes new ones. Example: a bull run, and then congestion. I will set stops under the congestion. The more contracts you trade, the more scale-outs you can have, making your trade longer and longer (if this is wanted). As a rule of thumb, the longer term the trade is, the less tight you need to keep your stops. On trend days, to catch the entire move, you will need to allow for pullbacks. In action, I'm frequently scaling out on pullbacks, and then adding to my position as the trend resumes. This is a work in progress, so please feel free to add to my thoughts. My other posts on exits: Live trade exit discussion, the benefits of scaling out. A couple of you have mentioned to me that you like examples (helps solidify the concept). Please understand that this is simply one example, and does not represent the concept in entirety.
  48. 1 point
    Sledge

    Edge VS Mentality

    Do you know why their is a 95% fail rate in this business? I do. And the reasons are simple: 1. New traders are lured by this idea that "this is an easy way to riches." The Market Makers have brilliant Marketing departments and they do a stellar job- believe me I have a B.S. in Marketing and over a decade in the field- I know good marketing. They shoot fish in a barrel. They tout short term trades. They WANT you to scalp for two reasons. One is the more trades you take, the more commissions they make. Secondly, Marketers are trained with psychology- they know what makes you tick- they know people and how they work. They know that even if the long term trend is bull, human nature to a "get rich quick" minded person will take tiny profits out of fear. 2. After they have baited you into doing something as silly as opening an account with $250 being as green as an Irish countryside- letting you overleverage the crap out of yourself- they part you of your $250 and hundreds of others. Knowing psychology again, they know that most people with be revengelful- they will fund the account with another $250 and take another crack at it- this time, they have you even MORE by the short and twisty's because you are pissed and want to get your first $250 back. They take you to the cleaners again! The cycle repeats over and over with millions of "get rich quick" greenhorns. 3. If after you have blown two accounts, and still want some more- you then set out on your search for the "Holy Grail." You start picking from the list of the 1000 indicators that your broker who just cleaned your clock TWICE gives you. "Must be a gift from the trading gods" you say- "all the answers are right here" you think- so you apply them, try them and eventually get parted from even more money. 4. If you are now beaten down for the third time- you can either A. Keep fighting the good fight and demo trade until you finally get it right or B. Give up on the markets all together. 5. If you choose A, you will study and learn what the markets are really all about, you will search not for "The Grail" but for the reasons the markets do what they do. You will search to find out how to read a chart instead of trying to take trades when one line crosses another or some Indicator tells you it is time to pull the trigger. You will take the hard road and work long hours to get to an edge. You will make money with your edge, and sometimes you will want to tweak the edge or realize that you can have multiple "edges" to draw money from the market. You will look at the market from a completely different perspective than you did when you started. You know that the market is not "out to get you." The market is there to do what it does- and either you are in harmony with the movements- or you are a dead man walking. The lesson: This is a hard road, this takes time, this takes patience to learn, this takes dicipline, it takes blood, sweat and tears. During your learning phase you will either crumble and give up, or you will have the heart to plow on ahead. 95%of people fail in this business because they don't have the balls to do what it takes to succeed. They don't have the gumption to fight through the learning stage to make it. PERIOD! Aaron
  49. 1 point
    marketguy

    Bid-Ask Tape Indicator

    mrsushi, You are a good guy. And there are lots of truly great and generous people in the trading world. I have met and continue to meet tons of them. As per Hubert and John, they are great salesmen (or at least Hubert is). Nobody is perfect. We all manipulate the facts, at times. Sure, Hubert is looking a little sleazy these days. And some in this forum will call them greedy. But, the bottom line is, are they providing a valuable service? Are people's education in trading really deepening and their results improving. We all start from the simple. We just want some arrows to tell us when to get in and when to get out. In time, after painful losses, we learn (or never learn) that it isn't that simple. We (hopefully) learn that we need to understand how the market works and we need to learn to read that dynamic movement. John and Hubert's motivations and priorities are in question. They seem to add more and more to the mix so that they can make more money. Any of those indicators (tools) they are offering can be used to positive purpose. I use some of them. But, I never use them in the often cut and dried way that those guys teach. I use them as information only. But, adding so much also muddies the waters, and I think that teachers should make it their priority to clear the waters. To help their students get to a deeper place of understanding. It has taken me over two years of indicator search/hell to start to understand that they are best used as training wheels or, at best, guides. The story is truly in the price action and volume. So Hubert, as someone who is primarily a tape reader, knows this. Yet, he is constantly pushing all these training wheels. And offering simplistic techniques that work great sometimes but can never work consistently. Getting back to your actions of posting the free indicators on the TTM site, I commended you on your boldness. I didn't think I knew knew you well enough to point out, what may be considered by some, your stupidity. Because, over all, I admire your action. Of course, they would get rid of the post ASAP. And, your relations with them are now different. And, you may be blackballed. But, you performed a service. And, hopefully, some people there took notice. We're all learning together. And your contribution (even though J and H might not like it) helps the greater community. And, in the end, that's what matters most. Whew. Long-winded response, huh? Take care. Bryan
  50. 1 point
    It really depends on the persons passion for the markets. One year is definitely not the norm. Your friend has done an amazing job in just one year. It took me 2 years of intense studying and trading to get to where I am. I was quite a journey. I would say on average it takes 2-3 years before one can start trading for a living. This is just my opinion, I am sure some may find me a slow learner.
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.