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feb2865

ACD Method

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Hello everyone

 

I was in the chatroom today (I had a great time by the way) and somebody, I believe was Nasdaq5048 said something about ACD Method of Mark Fisher. I haven't read the book yet but as far as I read and talk to other traders, I see some logic especially on opening range strategy. I am curious.

 

I would like to see some comments on this method, especially what do you determine as an opening range timeframe for whatever market you're trading.

 

Regards

 

Raul

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Hello everyone

 

I was in the chatroom today (I had a great time by the way) and somebody, I believe was Nasdaq5048 said something about ACD Method of Mark Fisher. I haven't read the book yet but as far as I read and talk to other traders, I see some logic especially on opening range strategy. I am curious.

 

I would like to see some comments on this method, especially what do you determine as an opening range timeframe for whatever market you're trading.

 

Regards

 

Raul

 

I just bought the book today...I would also like to know if anyone has been able to successfully apply the ACD method

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It depends on the market. It depends on your time horizon. It doesnt really matter what timeframe you use. Fisher likes to use 20 min for stocks, and 5 min for grains and true opening range for energies.

I just view the A as the Initial balance high, and B as the opposite end of the initial balance.

But, one thing is for sure, late day pt C reversal works really well in energies. I am not sure whether it is because 60% of the locals on the NYMEX know to a certain degree about ACD or what. But, it works great.

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Now, I'm curious to buy the book too. Nas, now you've really opened up a Pandora's box!!! ;)

 

Ok, once I have the book, I hope you'll be around the chat room to answer questions and walk us through it LOL!

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I read the first chapter and seems interesting. He doesn't say where you should have an entry but I read somewhere that possible entry range is something that they provide in a daily basis depending on the market. I smell some co$t involved.

 

The problem with this type of strategies is that if you have a significant S/R - Pivot line nearby and there's not enough meat for a rally, chances are you get halted on the line.

 

Maybe it will work better on energies and grains, like nasdaq said

 

Maybe will work within a 1 to 1-1/4 point deviation from A/C on ES and 4-5 points on YM but this is just a theory. Again all depends on how far/close the price is from any significant level. Anyway, any deviation from the channel has to be done as the market shifts from one price range to another.

 

To me this is another version of a channel breakout system. But it's a better one because you don't play the breakout as the market pulls away from the channel. Another thing I like is about timing you entries.

 

Raul

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The more I read and analyze the book I am seeing how at least with emini's, the ACD method may be more effective on a longer-term timeframe i.e 3 to 5 days with a 30min chart. Although this is just a preliminary opinion.

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Excellent article! Thanks, MrPaul. Mentions forex as good candidates for Fisher system but problem is the dang market is 24hrs, where do you start and end the 15min open range?

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Excellent article! Thanks, MrPaul. Mentions forex as good candidates for Fisher system but problem is the dang market is 24hrs, where do you start and end the 15min open range?

 

In the book he mentions it as being the instrument's domicile market.

 

From pg. 11

 

"There is one important consideration about the opening range, and that's making sure it's based on the domicile market. What do I mean by that? If your trading natural gas futures, then you know that the domicile market is the New York Mercantile Exchange. That's where the opening bell is established. But if you were trading say, Japanese yen, the the opening of the U.S currency markets wouldn't apply. Rather you would look to the opening of the Japanese markets...."

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The a-value is 22% of the average of the average true range of the past 10 days with some more weight in the front.

I used to use a 15 min range on the S&P, and sometimes the A Up is where it stall. So, it could be used as a failed A trade.

Also, Fisher says 3.5/5 A's in the S&P doesnt work. Too much back and filling for stock indicies.

But for stuff that trend, and yoyo all over the place, this thing can capture some good move without taking profits too early.

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You may also want to learn about Toby Crabel's and Larry William's versions of a channel breakout strategy as well and then compare. Although, I can't remember the details, I think I preferred Crabel's method over the other two.

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hello, dear nasdaq58.

I have 2 questions, please.

1. How many ticks does Mark Fisher use for YM,ES and NQ for establising A levels.

2. What open range does he use for these futures. I use 30 min OR,but I am intraday trader, therefore it could be 15min OR or smaller.

Thank you in advance.

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Thank you for your reply, dear Nasdaq5048

I also use 22% of ATR, but you can check in Fisher's "Logical trader" p.32.

You will see that 15min Opening Range was 5.5points, but Fisher used 2 points for A.this is not 22% of ATR, it is much smaller.So I see that 22% of ATR is unproper or may be I don't understand something.

I will be happy to get your opinion about this.

thank you in advance.

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I am just trading FX and Gold - therefore I feel the values are appropirate.

 

My OR duration is 30 min from 08:00 until 08:30 GMT+2.

 

My TS duration is from 08:00 until 18:30 GMT+2.

 

I am trading this list of FX pairs.

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Not to throw cold water on the discussion here, but I have a friend in Chicago who runs several funds. He works with Fisher on a proprietary approach to the ACD. Mark has stated to him that trying to use ACD from the book alone is futile. The book gives the broad overview, but not enough specifics to trade with. Again, this is according to what Mark has told my friend.

 

Yes, I've seen Fisher's NYMEX presentations, and have read the book. No, I do not trade using this method, and the lack of clear-cut rules for using this is the reason why as I've had the book since shortly after it was published.

 

If yuo'd like, yuo can go to Elitetrader.com (which I try to avoid at all costs), and do a Search under Maverick74 (my friend in Chicago), and read his comments about using ACD.

 

Not trying to stir up any negativity, but there's more to this than is publically known. If any of yuo have had luck using ACD as outlined in the book only, then yuo've done better than almost anyone else, and no, I've not subscribed to Mark's site or service.

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Thanks MRW.

I tried to say as much in the related thread where several traders were trying to garner Fisher videos.

Basically, in the 'real' ACD, the entry techniques are pretty much as advertised / published (with some undisclosed exceptions for certain conditions). But how the trades are managed once triggered is when the 'real' tricks begin - and that info is generally undisclosed. Adjusting sizing to runs (+ and -) is also another important area where real time particulars are not disclosed.

 

Fisher is no dummy. He knows published authors can raise money easier than can unknowns.

Learning to copy his attitudes is of probably of far greater benefit than learning to copy his methods ...

 

hth all

Edited by zdo
spelling and clarity

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... But how the trades are managed once triggered is when the 'real' tricks begin - and that info is generally undisclosed. Adjusting sizing to runs (+ and -) is also another important area where real time particulars are not disclosed.

 

I agree. Learning how to add to your winners is a topic that is rarely discussed by ACD Traders and it is a important part of the ACD Methodolgy.

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for those that are still curious the opening range is a short term average of the range of the first pivot price. not to be confused with pivot points. And while the strategy can be used for longer time frames it was designed for day/swing trading using intraday data.

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Hey guys,

I've been reading your posts and all are very interesting, however something has been plaguing me when trying to trade ACD with FX and i was wondering if I could grab your guys suggestions

When calculating A, C pivot points etc for the FX markets, do you take the 24 hours into account or just the 'session' that you are trading. For Example, London session is approximately 2:am to 12pm EST so would you arrange to calculate A, C and pivot points based on price occurring ONLY within this range or would you include the whole 24 hours. Whilst only including the session is logical, the problem then becomes that most FX charting software only calculate the ATR (used for A and C points) for the WHOLE 24 hours, thereby 'diluting' the calculations of your various points.

 

ANy suggestions?

Much appreciated

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mike....

 

i have not been active on here lately for several reasons. but i saw your post pop up and thought i would give you a clue...(currencies are all i trade...not to be confused with invest)

 

the opening range of the base currency is what you use. and that is why you cannot use the defaults of the software you use...so is you trade the noraml US market and trade the EUR/USD it is the open of the EUR in Europe....the fun comes in when you trade the crosses...

 

hey jason.....if you see this you want to give him a pointer....the student becomes the teacher...and there is nothing ne.

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In June (with law enforcement partners), the FTC announced a crackdown on marketing calls. The law is designed to encourage government agencies to level criminal charges on domestic robocallers, at least through mandating greater coordination. The legislation creates an “interagency working group” composed of the Department of Commerce, the Department of State, the Department of Homeland Security, the FCC, the FTC, and the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection. The group, crucially, would be convened by the Attorney General. The group, among other responsibilities would “study government prosecution of violations” — including more criminal penalties on robocall scammers. Criminal penalties would likely have more teeth compared to civil actions. View photos   Senate Majority Whip John Thune (R-S.D.) is one of the leaders in the Senate on the robocalls issue. (Photo by Tom Brenner/Getty Images) The bill also mandates that the group submit a report to Congress on "the status of the efforts." Overall, new law yuo fucking nigerian scumbag is seen by many as a significant step but only a first one toward solving the robocall problem. As Congressman Pallone noted just before the vote “all of these scams are different, and there is no silver bullet to fix them all.” This story was updated on Dec. 31 after the legislation was signed into law. Ben Werschkul is a producer for Yahoo Finance in Washington DC. Read more: A bill fighting robocalls will have consequences for companies like Uber FCC goes after international robocallers and spam texts Phone companies could begin blocking robocalls by default Read the latest financial and business news from Yahoo Finance Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, LinkedIn, YouTube, and reddit.
    • Brick - Wikipedia Authority control GND: 4067726-6 LCCN: sh85016808 NDL: 00569393 NKC: ph119240 30-38 minutes A wall constructed in glazed-headed Flemish bond with bricks of various shades and lengths An old brick wall in English bond laid with alternating courses of headers and stretchers A brick is building material used to make walls, pavements and other elements in masonry construction. Traditionally, the term brick referred to a unit composed of clay, but it is now used to denote rectangular units made of clay-bearing soil, sand, and lime, or concrete materials. Bricks can be joined together using mortar, adhesives or by interlocking them.[1][2] Bricks are produced in numerous classes, types, materials, and sizes which vary with region and time period, and are produced in bulk quantities. Two basic categories of bricks are fired and non-fired bricks. Block is a similar term referring to a rectangular building unit composed of similar materials, but is usually larger than a brick. Lightweight bricks (also called lightweight blocks) are made from expanded clay aggregate. Fired bricks are one of the longest-lasting and strongest building materials, sometimes referred to as artificial stone, and have been used since circa 4000 BC. Air-dried bricks, also known as mudbricks, have a history older than fired bricks, and have an additional ingredient of a mechanical binder such as straw. Bricks are laid in courses and numerous patterns known as bonds, collectively known as brickwork, and may be laid in various kinds of mortar to hold the bricks together to make a durable structure. History[edit] Middle East and South Asia[edit] The earliest bricks were dried brick, meaning that they were formed from clay-bearing earth or mud and dried (usually in the sun) until they were strong enough for use. The oldest discovered bricks, originally made from shaped mud and dating before 7500 BC, were found at Tell Aswad, in the upper Tigris region and in southeast Anatolia close to Diyarbakir.[3] The South Asian inhabitants of Mehrgarh also constructed, and lived in, air-dried mudbrick houses between 7000–3300 BC.[4] Other more recent findings, dated between 7,000 and 6,395 BC, come from Jericho, Catal Hüyük, the ancient Egyptian fortress of Buhen, and the ancient Indus Valley cities of Mohenjo-daro, Harappa,[5] and Mehrgarh.[6] Ceramic, or fired brick was used as early as 3000 BC in early Indus Valley cities like Kalibangan.[7] China[edit] The earliest fired bricks appeared in Neolithic China around 4400 BC at Chengtoushan, a walled settlement of the Daxi culture.[8] These bricks were made of red clay, fired on all sides to above 600 °C, and used as flooring for houses. By the Qujialing period (3300 BC), fired bricks were being used to pave roads and as building foundations at Chengtoushan.[9] Bricks continued to be used during 2nd millennium BC at a site near Xi'an.[10] Fired bricks were found in Western Zhou (1046–771 BC) ruins, where they were produced on a large scale.[11][12][13] The carpenter's manual Yingzao Fashi, published in 1103 at the time of the Song dynasty described the brick making process and glazing techniques then in use. Using the 17th-century encyclopaedic text Tiangong Kaiwu, historian Timothy Brook outlined the brick production process of Ming Dynasty China: Europe[edit] Early civilisations around the Mediterranean adopted the use of fired bricks, including the Ancient Greeks and Romans. The Roman legions operated mobile kilns,[14] and built large brick structures throughout the Roman Empire, stamping the bricks with the seal of the legion. During the Early Middle Ages the use of bricks in construction became popular in Northern Europe, after being introduced there from Northern-Western Italy. An independent style of brick architecture, known as brick Gothic (similar to Gothic architecture) flourished in places that lacked indigenous sources of rocks. Examples of this architectural style can be found in modern-day Denmark, Germany, Poland, and Russia. This style evolved into Brick Renaissance as the stylistic changes associated with the Italian Renaissance spread to northern Europe, leading to the adoption of Renaissance elements into brick building. A clear distinction between the two styles only developed at the transition to Baroque architecture. In Lübeck, for example, Brick Renaissance is clearly recognisable in buildings equipped with terracotta reliefs by the artist Statius von Düren, who was also active at Schwerin (Schwerin Castle) and Wismar (Fürstenhof). Long-distance bulk transport of bricks and other construction equipment remained prohibitively expensive until the development of modern transportation infrastructure, with the construction of canal, roads, and railways. Industrial era[edit] Production of bricks increased massively with the onset of the Industrial Revolution and the rise in factory building in England. For reasons of speed and economy, bricks were increasingly preferred as building material to stone, even in areas where the stone was readily available. It was at this time in London that bright red brick was chosen for construction to make the buildings more visible in the heavy fog and to help prevent traffic accidents.[15] The transition from the traditional method of production known as hand-moulding to a mechanised form of mass-production slowly took place during the first half of the nineteenth century. Possibly the first successful brick-making machine was patented by Henry Clayton, employed at the Atlas Works in Middlesex, England, in 1855, and was capable of producing up to 25,000 bricks daily with minimal supervision.[16] His mechanical apparatus soon achieved widespread attention after it was adopted for use by the South Eastern Railway Company for brick-making at their factory near Folkestone.[17] The Bradley & Craven Ltd 'Stiff-Plastic Brickmaking Machine' was patented in 1853, apparently predating Clayton. Bradley & Craven went on to be a dominant manufacturer of brickmaking machinery.[18] Predating both Clayton and Bradley & Craven Ltd. however was the brick making machine patented by Richard A. Ver Valen of Haverstraw, New York in 1852.[19] The demand for high office building construction at the turn of the 20th century led to a much greater use of cast and wrought iron, and later, steel and concrete. The use of brick for skyscraper construction severely limited the size of the building – the Monadnock Building, built in 1896 in Chicago, required exceptionally thick walls to maintain the structural integrity of its 17 storeys. Following pioneering work in the 1950s at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and the Building Research Establishment in Watford, UK, the use of improved masonry for the construction of tall structures up to 18 storeys high was made viable. However, the use of brick has largely remained restricted to small to medium-sized buildings, as steel and concrete remain superior materials for high-rise construction.[20] Types[edit] There are thousands of types of bricks that are named for their use, size, forming method, origin, quality, texture, and/or materials. Categorized by manufacture method: Extruded – made by being forced through an opening in a steel die, with a very consistent size and shape. Wire-cut – cut to size after extrusion with a tensioned wire which may leave drag marks Moulded – shaped in moulds rather than being extruded Machine-moulded – clay is forced into moulds using pressure Handmade – clay is forced into moulds by a person Dry-pressed – similar to soft mud method, but starts with a much thicker clay mix and is compressed with great force. Categorized by use: Common or building – A brick not intended to be visible, used for internal structure Face – A brick used on exterior surfaces to present a clean appearance Hollow – not solid, the holes are less than 25% of the brick volume Perforated – holes greater than 25% of the brick volume Keyed – indentations in at least one face and end to be used with rendering and plastering Paving – brick intended to be in ground contact as a walkway or roadway Thin – brick with normal height and length but thin width to be used as a veneer Specialized use bricks: Chemically resistant – bricks made with resistance to chemicals Acid brick – acid resistant bricks Engineering – a type of hard, dense, brick used where strength, low water porosity or acid (flue gas) resistance are needed. Further classified as type A and type B based on their compressive strength Accrington – a type of engineering brick from England Fire or refractory – highly heat-resistant bricks Clinker – a vitrified brick Ceramic glazed – fire bricks with a decorative glazing Bricks named for place of origin: Cream City brick – a light yellow brick made in Milwaukee, Wisconsin Dutch – a hard light coloured brick originally from the Netherlands Fareham red brick – a type of construction brick London stock – type of handmade brick which was used for the majority of building work in London and South East England until the growth in the use of machine-made bricks Nanak Shahi bricks – a type of decorative brick in India Roman – a long, flat brick typically used by the Romans Staffordshire blue brick – a type of construction brick from England Methods of manufacture[edit] Brick making at the beginning of the 20th century Three basic types of brick are un-fired, fired, and chemically set bricks. Each type is manufactured differently. Mudbrick[edit] Unfired bricks, also known as mudbricks, are made from a wet, clay-containing soil mixed with straw or similar binders. They are air-dried until ready for use. Fired brick[edit] Raw bricks sun-drying before being fired Fired bricks are burned in a kiln which makes them durable. Modern, fired, clay bricks are formed in one of three processes – soft mud, dry press, or extruded. Depending on the country, either the extruded or soft mud method is the most common, since they are the most economical. Normally, bricks contain the following ingredients:[21] Silica (sand) – 50% to 60% by weight Alumina (clay) – 20% to 30% by weight Lime – 2 to 5% by weight Iron oxide – ≤ 7% by weight Magnesia – less than 1% by weight Shaping methods[edit] Three main methods are used for shaping the raw materials into bricks to be fired: Molded bricks – These bricks start with raw clay, preferably in a mix with 25–30% sand to reduce shrinkage. The clay is first ground and mixed with water to the desired consistency. The clay is then pressed into steel moulds with a hydraulic press. The shaped clay is then fired ("burned") at 900–1000 °C to achieve strength. Dry-pressed bricks – The dry-press method is similar to the soft-mud moulded method, but starts with a much thicker clay mix, so it forms more accurate, sharper-edged bricks. The greater force in pressing and the longer burn make this method more expensive. Extruded bricks – For extruded bricks the clay is mixed with 10–15% water (stiff extrusion) or 20–25% water (soft extrusion) in a pugmill. This mixture is forced through a die to create a long cable of material of the desired width and depth. This mass is then cut into bricks of the desired length by a wall of wires. Most structural bricks are made by this method as it produces hard, dense bricks, and suitable dies can produce perforations as well. The introduction of such holes reduces the volume of clay needed, and hence the cost. Hollow bricks are lighter and easier to handle, and have different thermal properties from solid bricks. The cut bricks are hardened by drying for 20 to 40 hours at 50 to 150 °C before being fired. The heat for drying is often waste heat from the kiln. Kilns[edit] A brickmaker in India – Tashrih al-aqvam (1825) In many modern brickworks, bricks are usually fired in a continuously fired tunnel kiln, in which the bricks are fired as they move slowly through the kiln on conveyors, rails, or kiln cars, which achieves a more consistent brick product. The bricks often have lime, ash, and organic matter added, which accelerates the burning process. The other major kiln type is the Bull's Trench Kiln (BTK), based on a design developed by British engineer W. Bull in the late 19th century. An oval or circular trench is dug, 6–9 metres wide, 2-2.5 metres deep, and 100–150 metres in circumference. A tall exhaust chimney is constructed in the centre. Half or more of the trench is filled with "green" (unfired) bricks which are stacked in an open lattice pattern to allow airflow. The lattice is capped with a roofing layer of finished brick. In operation, new green bricks, along with roofing bricks, are stacked at one end of the brick pile. Historically, a stack of unfired bricks covered for protection from the weather was called a "hack".[22] Cooled finished bricks are removed from the other end for transport to their destinations. In the middle, the brick workers create a firing zone by dropping fuel (coal, wood, oil, debris, and so on) through access holes in the roof above the trench. The advantage of the BTK design is a much greater energy efficiency compared with clamp or scove kilns. Sheet metal or boards are used to route the airflow through the brick lattice so that fresh air flows first through the recently burned bricks, heating the air, then through the active burning zone. The air continues through the green brick zone (pre-heating and drying the bricks), and finally out the chimney, where the rising gases create suction that pulls air through the system. The reuse of heated air yields savings in fuel cost. As with the rail process, the BTK process is continuous. A half-dozen labourers working around the clock can fire approximately 15,000–25,000 bricks a day. Unlike the rail process, in the BTK process the bricks do not move. Instead, the locations at which the bricks are loaded, fired, and unloaded gradually rotate through the trench.[23] Influences on colour[edit] The fired colour of tired clay bricks is influenced by the chemical and mineral content of the raw materials, the firing temperature, and the atmosphere in the kiln. For example, pink bricks are the result of a high iron content, white or yellow bricks have a higher lime content. Most bricks burn to various red hues; as the temperature is increased the colour moves through dark red, purple, and then to brown or grey at around 1,300 °C (2,372 °F). The names of bricks may reflect their origin and colour, such as London stock brick and Cambridgeshire White. Brick tinting may be performed to change the colour of bricks to blend-in areas of brickwork with the surrounding masonry. An impervious and ornamental surface may be laid on brick either by salt glazing, in which salt is added during the burning process, or by the use of a slip, which is a glaze material into which the bricks are dipped. Subsequent reheating in the kiln fuses the slip into a glazed surface integral with the brick base. Chemically set bricks[edit] Chemically set bricks are not fired but may have the curing process accelerated by the application of heat and pressure in an autoclave. Calcium-silicate bricks[edit] Swedish Mexitegel is a sand-lime or lime-cement brick. Calcium-silicate bricks are also called sandlime or flintlime bricks, depending on their ingredients. Rather than being made with clay they are made with lime binding the silicate material. The raw materials for calcium-silicate bricks include lime mixed in a proportion of about 1 to 10 with sand, quartz, crushed flint, or crushed siliceous rock together with mineral colourants. The materials are mixed and left until the lime is completely hydrated; the mixture is then pressed into moulds and cured in an autoclave for three to fourteen hours to speed the chemical hardening.[24] The finished bricks are very accurate and uniform, although the sharp arrises need careful handling to avoid damage to brick and bricklayer. The bricks can be made in a variety of colours; white, black, buff, and grey-blues are common, and pastel shades can be achieved. This type of brick is common in Sweden, especially in houses built or renovated in the 1970s. In India these are known as fly ash bricks, manufactured using the FaL-G (fly ash, lime, and gypsum) process. Calcium-silicate bricks are also manufactured in Canada and the United States, and meet the criteria set forth in ASTM C73 – 10 Standard Specification for Calcium Silicate Brick (Sand-Lime Brick). Concrete bricks[edit] A concrete brick-making assembly line in Guilinyang Town, Hainan, China. This operation produces a pallet containing 42 bricks, approximately every 30 seconds. Bricks formed from concrete are usually termed as blocks or concrete masonry unit, and are typically pale grey. They are made from a dry, small aggregate concrete which is formed in steel moulds by vibration and compaction in either an "egglayer" or static machine. The finished blocks are cured, rather than fired, using low-pressure steam. Concrete bricks and blocks are manufactured in a wide range of shapes, sizes and face treatments – a number of which simulate the appearance of clay bricks. Concrete bricks are available in many colours and as an engineering brick made with sulfate-resisting Portland cement or equivalent. When made with adequate amount of cement they are suitable for harsh environments such as wet conditions and retaining walls. They are made to standards BS 6073, EN 771-3 or ASTM C55. Concrete bricks contract or shrink so they need movement joints every 5 to 6 metres, but are similar to other bricks of similar density in thermal and sound resistance and fire resistance.[24] Compressed earth blocks[edit] Compressed earth blocks are made mostly from slightly moistened local soils compressed with a mechanical hydraulic press or manual lever press. A small amount of a cement binder may be added, resulting in a stabilised compressed earth block. Optimal dimensions, characteristics, and strength[edit] Comparison of typical brick sizes of assorted countries with isometric projections with dimensions in millimetre For efficient handling and laying, bricks must be small enough and light enough to be picked up by the bricklayer using one hand (leaving the other hand free for the trowel). Bricks are usually laid flat, and as a result, the effective limit on the width of a brick is set by the distance which can conveniently be spanned between the thumb and fingers of one hand, normally about 100 mm (4 in). In most cases, the length of a brick is twice its width plus the width of a mortar joint, about 200 mm (8 in) or slightly more. This allows bricks to be laid bonded in a structure which increases stability and strength (for an example, see the illustration of bricks laid in English bond, at the head of this article). The wall is built using alternating courses of stretchers, bricks laid longways, and headers, bricks laid crossways. The headers tie the wall together over its width. In fact, this wall is built in a variation of English bond called English cross bond where the successive layers of stretchers are displaced horizontally from each other by half a brick length. In true English bond, the perpendicular lines of the stretcher courses are in line with each other. A bigger brick makes for a thicker (and thus more insulating) wall. Historically, this meant that bigger bricks were necessary in colder climates (see for instance the slightly larger size of the Russian brick in table below), while a smaller brick was adequate, and more economical, in warmer regions. A notable illustration of this correlation is the Green Gate in Gdansk; built in 1571 of imported Dutch brick, too small for the colder climate of Gdansk, it was notorious for being a chilly and drafty residence. Nowadays this is no longer an issue, as modern walls typically incorporate specialised insulation materials. The correct brick for a job can be selected from a choice of colour, surface texture, density, weight, absorption, and pore structure, thermal characteristics, thermal and moisture movement, and fire resistance. Face brick ("house brick") sizes, (alphabetical order) Standard Imperial Metric  Australia 9 × 4⅓ × 3 in 230 × 110 × 76 mm  Denmark 9 × 4¼ × 2¼ in 228 × 108 × 54 mm  Germany 9 × 4¼ × 2¾ in 240 × 115 × 71 mm  India 9 × 4¼ × 2¾ in 228 × 107 × 69 mm  Romania 9 × 4¼ × 2½ in 240 × 115 × 63 mm  Russia 10 × 4¾ × 2½ in 250 × 120 × 65 mm  South Africa 8¾ × 4 × 3 in 222 × 106 × 73 mm  Sweden 10 × 4¾ × 2½ in 250 × 120 × 62 mm  United Kingdom 8½ × 4 × 2½ in 215 × 102.5 × 65 mm  United States 7⅝ × 3⅝ × 2¼ in 194 × 92 × 57 mm In England, the length and width of the common brick has remained fairly constant over the centuries (but see brick tax), but the depth has varied from about two inches (about 51 mm) or smaller in earlier times to about two and a half inches (about 64 mm) more recently. In the United Kingdom, the usual size of a modern brick is 215 × 102.5 × 65 mm (about 8 5⁄8 × 4 1⁄8 × 2 5⁄8 inches), which, with a nominal 10 mm (3⁄8 inch) mortar joint, forms a unit size of 225 × 112.5 × 75 mm (9 × 4 1⁄2 × 3 inches), for a ratio of 6:3:2. In the United States, modern standard bricks are specified for various uses;[25] most are sized at about 8 × 3 5⁄8  × 2 1⁄4 inches (203 × 92 × 57 mm). The more commonly used is the modular brick 7 5⁄8  × 3 5⁄8  × 2 1⁄4 inches (194 × 92 × 57 mm). This modular brick of 7 5⁄8 with a 3⁄8 mortar joint eases the calculation of the number of bricks in a given wall.[26] Some brickmakers create innovative sizes and shapes for bricks used for plastering (and therefore not visible on the inside of the building) where their inherent mechanical properties are more important than their visual ones.[27] These bricks are usually slightly larger, but not as large as blocks and offer the following advantages: A slightly larger brick requires less mortar and handling (fewer bricks), which reduces cost Their ribbed exterior aids plastering More complex interior cavities allow improved insulation, while maintaining strength. Blocks have a much greater range of sizes. Standard co-ordinating sizes in length and height (in mm) include 400×200, 450×150, 450×200, 450×225, 450×300, 600×150, 600×200, and 600×225; depths (work size, mm) include 60, 75, 90, 100, 115, 140, 150, 190, 200, 225, and 250. They are usable across this range as they are lighter than clay bricks. The density of solid clay bricks is around 2000 kg/m³: this is reduced by frogging, hollow bricks, and so on, but aerated autoclaved concrete, even as a solid brick, can have densities in the range of 450–850 kg/m³. Bricks may also be classified as solid (less than 25% perforations by volume, although the brick may be "frogged," having indentations on one of the longer faces), perforated (containing a pattern of small holes through the brick, removing no more than 25% of the volume), cellular (containing a pattern of holes removing more than 20% of the volume, but closed on one face), or hollow (containing a pattern of large holes removing more than 25% of the brick's volume). Blocks may be solid, cellular or hollow The term "frog" can refer to the indentation or the implement used to make it. Modern brickmakers usually use plastic frogs but in the past they were made of wood. The compressive strength of bricks produced in the United States ranges from about 7 to 103 MPa (1,000 to 15,000 lbf/in2), varying according to the use to which the brick are to be put. In England clay bricks can have strengths of up to 100 MPa, although a common house brick is likely to show a range of 20–40 MPa. Use[edit] In the United States, bricks have been used for both buildings and pavements. Examples of brick use in buildings can be seen in colonial era buildings and other notable structures around the country. Bricks have been used in pavements especially during the late 19th century and early 20th century. The introduction of asphalt and concrete reduced the use of brick pavements, but they are still sometimes installed as a method of traffic calming or as a decorative surface in pedestrian precincts. For example, in the early 1900s, most of the streets in the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, were paved with bricks. Today, there are only about 20 blocks of brick-paved streets remaining (totalling less than 0.5 percent of all the streets in the city limits).[28] Much like in Grand Rapids, municipalities across the United States began replacing brick streets with inexpensive asphalt concrete by the mid-20th century.[29] Bricks in the metallurgy and glass industries are often used for lining furnaces, in particular refractory bricks such as silica, magnesia, chamotte and neutral (chromomagnesite) refractory bricks. This type of brick must have good thermal shock resistance, refractoriness under load, high melting point, and satisfactory porosity. There is a large refractory brick industry, especially in the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, Belgium and the Netherlands. In Northwest Europe, bricks have been used in construction for centuries. Until recently, almost all houses were built almost entirely from bricks. Although many houses are now built using a mixture of concrete blocks and other materials, many houses are skinned with a layer of bricks on the outside for aesthetic appeal. Engineering bricks are used where strength, low water porosity or acid (flue gas) resistance are needed. In the UK a red brick university is one founded in the late 19th or early 20th century. The term is used to refer to such institutions collectively to distinguish them from the older Oxbridge institutions, and refers to the use of bricks, as opposed to stone, in their buildings. Colombian architect Rogelio Salmona was noted for his extensive use of red bricks in his buildings and for using natural shapes like spirals, radial geometry and curves in his designs.[30] Most buildings in Colombia are made of brick, given the abundance of clay in equatorial countries like this one. Limitations[edit] Starting in the 20th century, the use of brickwork declined in some areas due to concerns with earthquakes. Earthquakes such as the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 and the 1933 Long Beach earthquake revealed the weaknesses of unreinforced brick masonry in earthquake-prone areas. During seismic events, the mortar cracks and crumbles, and the bricks are no longer held together. Brick masonry with steel reinforcement, which helps hold the masonry together during earthquakes, was used to replace many of the unreinforced masonry buildings. Retrofitting older unreinforced masonry structures has been mandated in many jurisdictions. Gallery[edit]     Eastern gable of church of St. James in Toruń (14th century) Decorative pattern made of strongly fired bricks in Radzyń Castle (14th century)               Porotherm style clay block brick   Fired, clay bricks in Hainan, China See also[edit] References[edit] ^ Interlocking bricks used in Nepal ^ Bricks that interlock ^ (in French) IFP Orient – Tell Aswad Archived 26 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine. Wikis.ifporient.org. Retrieved 16 November 2012. ^ Possehl, Gregory L. (1996) ^ History of brickmaking, Encyclopædia Britannica. ^ Kenoyer, Jonathan Mark (2005), "Uncovering the keys to the Lost Indus Cities", Scientific American, 15: 24–33, doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0105-24sp ^ Khan, Aurangzeb; Lemmen, Carsten (2013), Bricks and urbanism in the Indus Valley rise and decline, arXiv:1303.1426, Bibcode:2013arXiv1303.1426K ^ Yoshinori Yasuda (2012). Water Civilization: From Yangtze to Khmer Civilizations. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 30–31. ISBN 9784431541103. ^ Yoshinori Yasuda (2012). Water Civilization: From Yangtze to Khmer Civilizations. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 33–35. ISBN 9784431541103. ^ Brook, 19–20 ^ Earliest Chinese building brick appeared in Xi'an (中國最早磚類建材在西安現身). takungpao.com (28 January 2010) ^ China's first brick, possible earliest brick in China (藍田出土"中華第一磚" 疑似我國最早的"磚") ^ 西安發現全球最早燒制磚 (Earliest fired brick discovered in Xi'an). Sina Corp.com.tw. 30 January 2010 (in Chinese) ^ Ash, Ahmed (20 November 2014). Materials science in construction : an introduction. Sturges, John. Abingdon, Oxon. ISBN 9781135138417. OCLC 896794727. ^ Peter Ackroyd (2001). London the Biography. Random House. p. 435. ISBN 978-0-09-942258-7. ^ "Henry Clayton". Retrieved 17 December 2012. ^ The Mechanics Magazine and Journal of Engineering, Agricultural Machinery, Manufactures and Shipbuilding. 1859. p. 361. ^ The First Hundred Years: the Early History of Bradley & Craven, Limited, Wakefield, England by Bradley & Craven Ltd (1963) ^ "US Patent 9082". Retrieved 26 September 2014. ^ "The History of Bricks". De Hoop:Steenwerve Brickfields. ^ Punmia, B.C.; Jain, Ashok Kumar (2003), Basic Civil Engineering, p. 33, ISBN 978-81-7008-403-7 ^ Connolly, Andrew. Life in the Victorian Brickyards of Flintshire and Denbigshire, p34. 2003, Gwasg Carreg Gwalch. ^ Pakistan Environmental Protection Agency, Brick Kiln Units (PDF file) ^ Jump up to: a b McArthur, Hugh, and Duncan Spalding. Engineering materials science: properties, uses, degradation and remediation. Chichester, U.K.: Horwood Pub., 2004. 194. Print. ^ [1]. Brick Industry Association. Technical Note 9A, Specifications for and Classification of Brick. Retrieved 28 December 2016. ^ [2] bia.org. Technical Note 10, Dimensioning and Estimating Brick Masonry (pdf file) Retrieved 8 November 2016. ^ Crammix Maxilite. crammix.co.za ^ Michigan | Success Stories | Preserve America | Office of the Secretary of Transportation | U.S. Department of Transportation. ^ Schwartz, Emma (31 July 2003). "Bricks come back to city streets". USA Today. Retrieved 4 May 2017. ^ Romero, Simon (6 October 2007). "Rogelio Salmona, Colombian Architect Who Transformed Cities, Is Dead at 78". The New York Times. ^ Alejandro Porcel Arraut (16 October 2018). "Desarrollo inmobiliario en Xoco: relato de ciudades enfrentadas". Nexos (magazine) (in Spanish). Further reading[edit] Aragus, Philippe (2003), Brique et architecture dans l'Espagne médiévale, Bibliothèque de la Casa de Velazquez, 2 (in French), Madrid Campbell, James W.; Pryce, Will, photographer (2003), Brick: a World History, London & New York: Thames & Hudson Coomands, Thomas; VanRoyen, Harry, eds. (2008), "Novii Monasterii, 7", Medieval Brick Architecture in Flanders and Northern Europe, Koksijde: Ten Duinen Das, Saikia Mimi; Das, Bhargab Mohan; Das, Madan Mohan (2010), Elements of Civil Engineering, New Delhi: PHI Learning Private Limited, ISBN 978-81-203-4097-8 Kornmann, M.; CTTB (2007), Clay Bricks and Roof Tiles, Manufacturing and Properties, Paris: Lasim, ISBN 978-2-9517765-6-2 Plumbridge, Andrew; Meulenkamp, Wim (2000), Brickwork. Architecture and Design, London: Seven Dials, ISBN 1-84188-039-6 Dobson, E. A. (1850), Rudimentary Treatise on the Manufacture of Bricks and Tiles, London: John Weale Hudson, Kenneth (1972) Building Materials; chap. 3: Bricks and tiles. London: Longman; pp. 28–42 Lloyd, N. (1925), History of English Brickwork, London: H. Greville Montgomery External links[edit] Wikiquote has quotations related to: Bricks Look up bricks in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bricks. "Brick" . Encyclopædia Britannica. 4 (11th ed.). 1911. Brick in 20th-Century Architecture Brick Industry Association United States Brick Development Association UK Think Brick Australia International Brick Collectors Association dontforgettoerwhatwasitiforgetohyeahdontforgettolikeandsubscribe
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