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RichardCox

Invalidated Price Patterns

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Forex trading with price patterns is perhaps more prevalent than what is seen in the trading of other financial asset classes (such as stocks or commodities). This is often explained by the fact that the fundamental picture for a currency (i.e. the economy of an entire country) is much more difficult to assess than the similar elements in an individual stock. Because of this, price patterns in the forex markets tend to have more force and accuracy because there is a larger percentage of the trading community that are aware of these patterns as they arise.

 

Pattern Parameters

 

From a trader’s perspective, price patterns are particularly useful because of the way these patterns define clear levels for position entries and exits. It is also relatively easy to see instances when the price pattern itself is valid or invalidated. One problem, however, is that these patterns are subjective. Some traders make the mistake of using pattern recognition software, and then use those signals as if they are accurate in all cases. The issue here is that input parameters for these patterns must be set in advance and are only as accurate as the human input that defined those parameters.

 

So, while it must be understood that any price pattern is a subjective construct, it is important to know how to set trades based on these formations so that you are well-prepared even in cases where those formations prove to be invalid. The main idea here is to take these formations from a risk-based perspective, as this area (failed structures) is one that is most often neglected. This is also the area that creates the largest number of destructive events in personal trading accounts. So, in order to build trading confidence, you will need to know the price elements that formed your trade in the first place. Then, you will need to work from your own version of those paramaters.

 

Price Targets and Invalidation Points

 

When dealing with patterns, price targets and invalidation points are some of the first parameters that must be set. Channel formations give relatively clear-cut levels here, as prices are expected to remain contained within the uptrend and downtrend lines that make up support and resistance. In the first charted example, we have a downtrend channel, which is often used to initiate short positions. Short trade entries are taken as prices reach the top of the pattern, while profit exits can be taken as prices approach the channel bottom. Stop losses can be places above prior resistance levels (as any activity above these areas would end the series of lower highs). Alternatively, the position can be exited if prices break above the downtrend line, as this invalidates the pattern.

 

Using Patterns to Mark Dynamic Support and Resistance

 

Perhaps the biggest advantage of price patterns is how they can make it easy to spot support and resistance levels. Since these are areas in which buyers and sellers start to emerge, these levels are highly valuable in determining trade entries. Further more, if these levels are invalidated, price momentum will often accelerate, as the market is now forced to re-position itself for the shifting paradigm. Pattern examples here include triangles, flags, rectangles and pennants.

 

Once these patterns are recognized, you will be able to use the defined parameters in the pattern to not only determine your directional bias (for long or short positions) but your exit and entry points as well. As with all price patterns, the most critical event that can be seen when basing trades here is to spot instances where those patterns have become invalidated. In the second charted example, we have a descending triangle, which reveals a bearish bias on the pair. Any trader that takes a position based on the assumption that the series of lower highs will generate new lows is forced to bail-out once the resistance line is broken and the overall pattern is invalidated.

 

In cases like this, the broken resistance line should have lit warning flares, prompting the trader to close any bearish positions. This is true for a few different reasons. As we can see in the example, prices rally and this could have created substantial losses for any trader in a bearish position. Of course, we have no way of knowing for sure that prices will rally this strongly. But once the resistance line is broken, it is clear that the paradigm has shifted and that the market will start viewing the currency pair’s momentum in a different way. At the same time, our original reason for entering the trade has been removed. Because of this, there is essentially no reason to remain invested to the downside, and the position should not remain open.

 

Recognizing Price Patterns

 

So while it is true that price patterns are highly subjective, over time it does become easier to recognize these formations quickly and efficiently. These structures give traders a sense of where the market is headed, even in cases where there is no clear trend or momentum direction in your chosen currency pair. But at the same time, you will need to determine the levels at which the structure (and your original analysis) is starting to break down, making positions vulnerable to excessive losses if kept open.

 

Even for successful trades, it is important to look at the parameters you have set for the pattern, as this will give you an indication for when a trending move is in its mature stages and unlikely to continue. There is almost nothing worse than seeing a successful trade turn into a loss, so failing to react once your pattern parameters have been tested is a largely unnecessary mistake.

 

Risk-to-Reward Ratios

 

The final element to consider when establishing a price pattern position is the risk-to-reward ratio that is seen. Of course, it makes no sense to put $10 at risk when there is only the possibility of making $5 if the trade proves profitable. This is a recipe for failure for any long-term approach. Common advice is to risk only $1 in downside for every potential $3 in upside. Any price patterns identified should be used not only to determine entry points and direction, but profit and loss ratios as well.

 

Let’s look again at the original downtrend channel example. Here, we have a downside bias, based on a series of lower highs. The width of the channel is about 210 pips, which means this is the targeted profit. This also means stop losses should be no more than 70 from the entry. This works well in terms of the charted example, because if prices were to travel 70 pips in the positive direction after the trade is triggered, the channel would no longer be valid and there would be no reason to hold onto the trade. In other cases, these risk to reward levels do not match up. In these cases, the trade idea should be forfeited and we should look for better opportunities elsewhere.

 

Conclusion: Invalidated Patterns Remove Rationale Behind Positions

 

From these examples, we can see that price patterns are great tools for arriving at a position bias in cases where there is not even a clear trend in place. But once these patterns are invalidated, the trader must reassess the market’s activity and consider positions in another area of the market. Two traders looking at the same chart might see entirely different formations, and place trades that while well thought-out might be in complete disagreement. But at the same time, it is important to hold true to your original analysis and reconsider your position once an invalidated pattern suggests that your initial ideas are unlikely to play-out.

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thank you for your post.........when trading, patterns should definitely be taken into consideration......for example when dealing with contracting triangles (as they are the most common way of consolidation), they might be reversal or continuation patterns.....so tricky but once broken you have the direction.

 

thanks again

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thank you for your post.........when trading, patterns should definitely be taken into consideration......for example when dealing with contracting triangles (as they are the most common way of consolidation), they might be reversal or continuation patterns.....so tricky but once broken you have the direction.

 

thanks again

 

 

I saw 2 bearish analysts on yahoo the other day.Not something I often do,but once in a while I need a good laugh.

One is bearish for fundamental reasons and one is extremely bearish based on a chart pattern.I am bullish since I place great faith in the power of the Fed and the persistence of a bull market...hence the comedy.

She (the extremely bearish one) has decided (unless she's really a lying shill who is actually long or trying to make a name for herself-she'll look like a genius if her prediction is correct) that we are about to drop 20% from the year high.....:rofl:

 

She bases this prediction on the fact that price when at the top of her ludicrously incorrectly drawn channels keeps showing broadening ED's followed by pullbacks....uh,ok, but then ..oh,never mind.Why do the dumbest people get highly paid jobs in this industry?Does comedy have a place in this business?

 

Given the choice,and all traders have a choice,tradingwizzard prefers to let the market show it's hand,but the so called expert believes she can make stunning predictions,extremely bearish ones in a bull market at that. ...based on a (perceived) pattern.

If you let the market show it's hand the pattern may be almost irrelevant..except to alert you to the fact that consolidation means either continuation or reversal.

But a glance at current daily ranges will tell you exactly the same thing...no?

So,patterns for me..not so much.And comedy doesn't improve my trading results..unless I incorporate fading clowns whenever I see one.

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I am always looking for patterns......seem to be lost without them, and probably the reasoning is that I am probably more of a technical trader than a fundamental one....

 

for example with the Fed....I don't doubt the power of the Fed, or the ECB, or whatever, but from my point of view price cannot fall/rise without breaking some levels on the smaller time frames....it is impossible to fly and skip them....so unless levels are broken, then the turn won't happening.....it's like looking at the downside in an upward trend without the trend line to be broken....just saying

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I am always looking for patterns......seem to be lost without them, and probably the reasoning is that I am probably more of a technical trader than a fundamental one....

 

for example with the Fed....I don't doubt the power of the Fed, or the ECB, or whatever, but from my point of view price cannot fall/rise without breaking some levels on the smaller time frames....it is impossible to fly and skip them....so unless levels are broken, then the turn won't happening.....it's like looking at the downside in an upward trend without the trend line to be broken....just saying

 

Don't get me wrong,i'm a highly technical trader and price structure and levels are all important for me.

I just prefer to use things that are as less subjective as possible.Trendlines are drawn differently by different traders looking at exactly the same chart.You also need,in any case,several data points before they can be drawn.So I prefer horizontal lines only.

You might say fine but where do you draw those from?You can't claim horizontal lines are the holy grail.All I can say without sidetracking this thread is for me they are less problematical and only require single data points.They also do not require any future adjustment.

I'm not a fan of traditional patterns.But I guess at least with,say a H&S,you can predict the expected price level for the right shoulder.That's a more realistic prediction on a more frequent basis than a 20% drop based on subjectively drawn trendlines completely contrary to current market context.

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Don't get me wrong,i'm a highly technical trader and price structure and levels are all important for me.

I just prefer to use things that are as less subjective as possible.Trendlines are drawn differently by different traders looking at exactly the same chart.You also need,in any case,several data points before they can be drawn.So I prefer horizontal lines only.

You might say fine but where do you draw those from?You can't claim horizontal lines are the holy grail.All I can say without sidetracking this thread is for me they are less problematical and only require single data points.They also do not require any future adjustment.

I'm not a fan of traditional patterns.But I guess at least with,say a H&S,you can predict the expected price level for the right shoulder.That's a more realistic prediction on a more frequent basis than a 20% drop based on subjectively drawn trendlines completely contrary to current market context.

 

you said you can predict the expected level for the right shoulder......well, IF it is a H&S,......more likely you can predict the measured move, but IF you have the right neckline....and this is not horizontal all the time....but this is off topic anyways

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One problem, however, is that these patterns are subjective. Some traders make the mistake of using pattern recognition software, and then use those signals as if they are accurate in all cases.

 

I sense that you use the term "price patterns" to mean chart patterns, things like triangles, double bottoms, etc. which are indeed subjective to some extend. But when people talk about price patterns they usually mean things like inside days, island reversals, closing winning streaks, etc. which are more or less objective. See how this guy has made objective the search for price patterns and the methods he uses for their validation that include portfolio backtests, cross-validation and sensitivity analysis.

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The findings showed something remarkably simple yet profound: most people took more pain from losses than pleasure from gains. It feels “good enough” to make $450 versus $500, but accepting a $500 loss hurts too much and many are willing to gamble that the trade turns around. This doesn’t make any sense from a trading perspective—500 dollars lost are equivalent to 500 dollars gained; one is not worth more than the other. Why should we then act so differently? Prospect Theory: Losses Typically Hurt Far More than Gains Give Pleasure Taking a purely rational approach to markets means treating a 50 point gain as morally equivalent to a 50 point loss. Unfortunately our data on real trader behavior suggests that the majority can’t do this. We need to think more systematically to improve our chances at success. Avoid the Common Pitfall Avoiding the loss-making problem described above is very simple in theory: gain more in each winning trade than you give back in each losing trade. But how might we do it concretely? When trading, always follow one simple rule: always seek a bigger reward than the loss you are risking. This is a valuable piece of advice that can be found in almost every trading book. Typically, this is called a “reward/risk ratio”. If you risk losing the same number of pips as you hope to gain, then your reward/risk ratio is 1-to-1 (also written 1:1). If you target a profit of 80 pips with a risk of 40 pips, then you have a 2:1 reward/risk ratio. If you follow this simple rule, you can be right on the direction of only half of your trades and still make money because you will earn more profits on your winning trades than losses on your losing trades. What ratio should you use? It depends on the type of trade you are making. We recommend to always use a minimum 1:1 ratio. That way, if you are right only half the time, you will at least break even. Certain strategies and trading techniques tend to produce high winning percentages as we saw with real trader data. If this is the case, it is possible to use a lower reward/risk ratio—such as between 1:1 and 2:1. For lower probability trading, a higher reward/risk ratio is recommended, such as 2:1, 3:1, or even 4:1. Remember, the higher the reward/risk ratio you choose, the less often you need to correctly predict market direction in order to make money trading. We will discuss different trading techniques in further detail in subsequent installments of this series. Stick to Your Plan: Use Stops and Limits Once you have a trading plan that uses a proper reward/risk ratio, the next challenge is to stick to the plan. Remember, it is natural for humans to want to hold on to losses and take profits early, but it makes for bad trading. We must overcome this natural tendency and remove our emotions from trading. The best way to do this is to set up your trade with Stop-Loss and Limit orders from the beginning. This will allow you to use the proper reward/risk ratio (1:1 or higher) from the outset, and to stick to it. Once you set them, don’t touch them (One exception: you can move your stop in your favor to lock in profits as the market moves in your favor). Managing your risk in this way is a part of what many traders call “money management”. Many of the most successful forex traders are right about the market’s direction less than half the time. Since they practice good money management, they cut their losses quickly and let their profits run, so they are still profitable in their overall trading. Does Using 1:1 Reward to Risk Really Work? Our data certainly suggest it does. We use our data on our top 15 currency pairs to determine which trader accounts closed their Average Gain at least as large as their Average Loss—or a minimum Reward:Risk of 1:1. Were traders ultimately profitable if they stuck to this rule? Past performance is not indicative of future results, but the results certainly support it. Our data shows that 53 percent of all accounts which operated on at least a 1:1 Reward to Risk ratio turned a net-profit in our 12-month sample period. Those under 1:1? A mere 17 percent. Traders who adhered to this rule were 3 times more likely to turn a profit over the course of these 12 months—a substantial difference. Why Do Many Forex Traders Lose Money? Here is the Number 1 Mistake David Rodriguez 11-14 minutes We look through 43 million real trades to measure trader performance Majority of trades are successful and yet traders are losing Reward to Risk ratios play a vital role in capital preservation Why do major currency moves bring increased trader losses? To find out, the DailyFX research team has looked through over 40 million real trades placed via a major FX broker's trading platforms. In this article, we look at the biggest mistake that forex traders make, and a way to trade appropriately. Why Does the Average Forex Trader Lose Money? The average forex trader loses money, which is in itself a very discouraging fact. But why? Put simply, human psychology makes trading difficult. We looked at over 43 million real trades placed on a major FX broker's trading servers from Q2, 2014 – Q1, 2015 and came to some very interesting conclusions. The first is encouraging: traders make money most of the time as over 50% of trades are closed out at a gain. Percent of All Trades Closed Out at a Gain and Loss per Currency Pair Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart shows results of over 43 million trades conducted by these traders worldwide from Q2, 2014 through Q1, 2015 across the 15 most popular currency pairs. The blue bar shows the percentage of trades that ended with a profit for the trader. Red shows the percentage of trades that ended in loss. For example, the Euro saw an impressive 61% of all trades closed out at a gain. And indeed every single one of these instruments saw the majority of traders turned a profit more than 50 percent of the time. If traders were right more than half of the time, why did most lose money? Average Profit/Loss per Winning and Losing Trades per Currency Pair Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart says it all. In blue, it shows the average number of pips traders earned on profitable trades. In red, it shows the average number of pips lost in losing trades. We can now clearly see why traders lose money despite being right more than half the time. They lose more money on their losing trades than they make on their winning trades. Let’s use EUR/USD as an example. We see that EUR/USD trades were closed out at a profit 61% of the time, but the average losing trade was worth 83 pips while the average winner was only 48 pips. Traders were correct more than half the time, but they lost over 70% more on their losing trades as they won on winning trades. The track record for the volatile GBP/USD pair was even worse. Traders captured profits on 59% of all GBP/USD trades. Yet they overall lost money as they turned an average 43 pip profit on each winner and lost 83 pips on losing trades. What gives? Identifying that there is a problem is important in itself, but we’ll need to understand the reasons behind it in order to look for a solution. Cut Losses, Let Profits Run – Why is this So Difficult to Do? In our study we saw that traders were very good at identifying profitable trading opportunities--closing trades out at a profit over 50 percent of the time. They utlimately lost, however, as the average loss far outweighed the gain. Open nearly any book on trading and the advice is the same: cut your losses early and let your profits run. When your trade goes against you, close it out. Take the small loss and then try again later, if appropriate. It is better to take a small loss early than a big loss later. If a trade is in your favor, let it run. It is often tempting to close out at a small gain in order to protect profits, but oftentimes we see that patience can result in greater gains. But if the solution is so simple, why is the issue so common? The simple answer: human nature. In fact this is not at all limited to trading. To further illustrate the point we draw on significant findings in psychology. A Simple Wager – Understanding Human Behavior Towards Winning and Losing What if I offered you a simple wager on a coin flip? You have two choices. Choice A means you have a 50% chance of winning 1000 dollars and 50% chance of winning nothing. Choice B is a flat 450 point gain. Which would you choose?         Expected Return Gains Choice A 50% chance to Win 1000 50% chance to Win 0 Expect to win $500 over time   Choice B Win 450   Win $450 Over time it makes sense to take Choice A—the expected gain of $500 is greater than the fixed $450. Yet many studies have shown that most people will consistently choose Choice B. Let’s flip the wager and run it again.         Expected Return Losses Choice A 50% chance to Lose 1000 50% chance to Lose 0 Expect to lose $500 over time   Choice B Lose 450   Lose $450 In this case we can expect to lose less money via Choice B, but in fact studies have shown that the majority of people will pick choice A every single time. Here we see the issue. Most people avoid risk when it comes to taking profits but then actively seek it if it means avoiding a loss. Why? Losses Hurt Psychologically far more than Gains Give Pleasure – Prospect Theory Nobel prize-winning clinical psychologist Daniel Kahneman based on his research on decision making. His work wasn’t on trading per se but clear implications for trade management and is quite relevant to FX trading. His study on Prospect Theory attempted to model and predict choices people would make between scenarios involving known risks and rewards. The findings showed something remarkably simple yet profound: most people took more pain from losses than pleasure from gains. It feels “good enough” to make $450 versus $500, but accepting a $500 loss hurts too much and many are willing to gamble that the trade turns around. This doesn’t make any sense from a trading perspective—500 dollars lost are equivalent to 500 dollars gained; one is not worth more than the other. Why should we then act so differently? Prospect Theory: Losses Typically Hurt Far More than Gains Give Pleasure Taking a purely rational approach to markets means treating a 50 point gain as morally equivalent to a 50 point loss. Unfortunately our data on real trader behavior suggests that the majority can’t do this. We need to think more systematically to improve our chances at success. Avoid the Common Pitfall Avoiding the loss-making problem described above is very simple in theory: gain more in each winning trade than you give back in each losing trade. But how might we do it concretely? When trading, always follow one simple rule: always seek a bigger reward than the loss you are risking. This is a valuable piece of advice that can be found in almost every trading book. Typically, this is called a “reward/risk ratio”. If you risk losing the same number of pips as you hope to gain, then your reward/risk ratio is 1-to-1 (also written 1:1). If you target a profit of 80 pips with a risk of 40 pips, then you have a 2:1 reward/risk ratio. If you follow this simple rule, you can be right on the direction of only half of your trades and still make money because you will earn more profits on your winning trades than losses on your losing trades. What ratio should you use? It depends on the type of trade you are making. We recommend to always use a minimum 1:1 ratio. That way, if you are right only half the time, you will at least break even. Certain strategies and trading techniques tend to produce high winning percentages as we saw with real trader data. If this is the case, it is possible to use a lower reward/risk ratio—such as between 1:1 and 2:1. For lower probability trading, a higher reward/risk ratio is recommended, such as 2:1, 3:1, or even 4:1. Remember, the higher the reward/risk ratio you choose, the less often you need to correctly predict market direction in order to make money trading. We will discuss different trading techniques in further detail in subsequent installments of this series. Stick to Your Plan: Use Stops and Limits Once you have a trading plan that uses a proper reward/risk ratio, the next challenge is to stick to the plan. Remember, it is natural for humans to want to hold on to losses and take profits early, but it makes for bad trading. We must overcome this natural tendency and remove our emotions from trading. The best way to do this is to set up your trade with Stop-Loss and Limit orders from the beginning. This will allow you to use the proper reward/risk ratio (1:1 or higher) from the outset, and to stick to it. Once you set them, don’t touch them (One exception: you can move your stop in your favor to lock in profits as the market moves in your favor). Managing your risk in this way is a part of what many traders call “money management”. Many of the most successful forex traders are right about the market’s direction less than half the time. Since they practice good money management, they cut their losses quickly and let their profits run, so they are still profitable in their overall trading. Does Using 1:1 Reward to Risk Really Work? Our data certainly suggest it does. We use our data on our top 15 currency pairs to determine which trader accounts closed their Average Gain at least as large as their Average Loss—or a minimum Reward:Risk of 1:1. Were traders ultimately profitable if they stuck to this rule? Past performance is not indicative of future results, but the results certainly support it. Our data shows that 53 percent of all accounts which operated on at least a 1:1 Reward to Risk ratio turned a net-profit in our 12-month sample period. Those under 1:1? A mere 17 percent. Traders who adhered to this rule were 3 times more likely to turn a profit over the course of these 12 months—a substantial difference. Why Do Many Forex Traders Lose Money? Here is the Number 1 Mistake David Rodriguez 11-14 minutes We look through 43 million real trades to measure trader performance Majority of trades are successful and yet traders are losing Reward to Risk ratios play a vital role in capital preservation Why do major currency moves bring increased trader losses? To find out, the DailyFX research team has looked through over 40 million real trades placed via a major FX broker's trading platforms. In this article, we look at the biggest mistake that forex traders make, and a way to trade appropriately. Why Does the Average Forex Trader Lose Money? The average forex trader loses money, which is in itself a very discouraging fact. But why? Put simply, human psychology makes trading difficult. We looked at over 43 million real trades placed on a major FX broker's trading servers from Q2, 2014 – Q1, 2015 and came to some very interesting conclusions. The first is encouraging: traders make money most of the time as over 50% of trades are closed out at a gain. Percent of All Trades Closed Out at a Gain and Loss per Currency Pair   Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart shows results of over 43 million trades conducted by these traders worldwide from Q2, 2014 through Q1, 2015 across the 15 most popular currency pairs. The blue bar shows the percentage of trades that ended with a profit for the trader. Red shows the percentage of trades that ended in loss. For example, the Euro saw an impressive 61% of all trades closed out at a gain. And indeed every single one of these instruments saw the majority of traders turned a profit more than 50 percent of the time. If traders were right more than half of the time, why did most lose money? Average Profit/Loss per Winning and Losing Trades per Currency Pair Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart says it all. In blue, it shows the average number of pips traders earned on profitable trades. In red, it shows the average number of pips lost in losing trades. We can now clearly see why traders lose money despite being right more than half the time. They lose more money on their losing trades than they make on their winning trades. Let’s use EUR/USD as an example. We see that EUR/USD trades were closed out at a profit 61% of the time, but the average losing trade was worth 83 pips while the average winner was only 48 pips. Traders were correct more than half the time, but they lost over 70% more on their losing trades as they won on winning trades. The track record for the volatile GBP/USD pair was even worse. Traders captured profits on 59% of all GBP/USD trades. Yet they overall lost money as they turned an average 43 pip profit on each winner and lost 83 pips on losing trades. What gives? Identifying that there is a problem is important in itself, but we’ll need to understand the reasons behind it in order to look for a solution. Cut Losses, Let Profits Run – Why is this So Difficult to Do? In our study we saw that traders were very good at identifying profitable trading opportunities--closing trades out at a profit over 50 percent of the time. They utlimately lost, however, as the average loss far outweighed the gain. Open nearly any book on trading and the advice is the same: cut your losses early and let your profits run. When your trade goes against you, close it out. Take the small loss and then try again later, if appropriate. It is better to take a small loss early than a big loss later. If a trade is in your favor, let it run. It is often tempting to close out at a small gain in order to protect profits, but oftentimes we see that patience can result in greater gains. But if the solution is so simple, why is the issue so common? The simple answer: human nature. In fact this is not at all limited to trading. To further illustrate the point we draw on significant findings in psychology. A Simple Wager – Understanding Human Behavior Towards Winning and Losing What if I offered you a simple wager on a coin flip? You have two choices. Choice A means you have a 50% chance of winning 1000 dollars and 50% chance of winning nothing. Choice B is a flat 450 point gain. Which would you choose?         Expected Return Gains Choice A 50% chance to Win 1000 50% chance to Win 0 Expect to win $500 over time   Choice B Win 450   Win $450 Over time it makes sense to take Choice A—the expected gain of $500 is greater than the fixed $450. Yet many studies have shown that most people will consistently choose Choice B. Let’s flip the wager and run it again.         Expected Return Losses Choice A 50% chance to Lose 1000 50% chance to Lose 0 Expect to lose $500 over time   Choice B Lose 450   Lose $450 In this case we can expect to lose less money via Choice B, but in fact studies have shown that the majority of people will pick choice A every single time. Here we see the issue. Most people avoid risk when it comes to taking profits but then actively seek it if it means avoiding a loss. Why? Losses Hurt Psychologically far more than Gains Give Pleasure – Prospect Theory Nobel prize-winning clinical psychologist Daniel Kahneman based on his research on decision making. His work wasn’t on trading per se but clear implications for trade management and is quite relevant to FX trading. His study on Prospect Theory attempted to model and predict choices people would make between scenarios involving known risks and rewards. The findings showed something remarkably simple yet profound: most people took more pain from losses than pleasure from gains. It feels “good enough” to make $450 versus $500, but accepting a $500 loss hurts too much and many are willing to gamble that the trade turns around. This doesn’t make any sense from a trading perspective—500 dollars lost are equivalent to 500 dollars gained; one is not worth more than the other. Why should we then act so differently? Prospect Theory: Losses Typically Hurt Far More than Gains Give Pleasure Taking a purely rational approach to markets means treating a 50 point gain as morally equivalent to a 50 point loss. Unfortunately our data on real trader behavior suggests that the majority can’t do this. We need to think more systematically to improve our chances at success. Avoid the Common Pitfall Avoiding the loss-making problem described above is very simple in theory: gain more in each winning trade than you give back in each losing trade. But how might we do it concretely? When trading, always follow one simple rule: always seek a bigger reward than the loss you are risking. This is a valuable piece of advice that can be found in almost every trading book. Typically, this is called a “reward/risk ratio”. If you risk losing the same number of pips as you hope to gain, then your reward/risk ratio is 1-to-1 (also written 1:1). If you target a profit of 80 pips with a risk of 40 pips, then you have a 2:1 reward/risk ratio. If you follow this simple rule, you can be right on the direction of only half of your trades and still make money because you will earn more profits on your winning trades than losses on your losing trades. What ratio should you use? It depends on the type of trade you are making. We recommend to always use a minimum 1:1 ratio. That way, if you are right only half the time, you will at least break even. Certain strategies and trading techniques tend to produce high winning percentages as we saw with real trader data. If this is the case, it is possible to use a lower reward/risk ratio—such as between 1:1 and 2:1. For lower probability trading, a higher reward/risk ratio is recommended, such as 2:1, 3:1, or even 4:1. Remember, the higher the reward/risk ratio you choose, the less often you need to correctly predict market direction in order to make money trading. We will discuss different trading techniques in further detail in subsequent installments of this series. Stick to Your Plan: Use Stops and Limits Once you have a trading plan that uses a proper reward/risk ratio, the next challenge is to stick to the plan. Remember, it is natural for humans to want to hold on to losses and take profits early, but it makes for bad trading. We must overcome this natural tendency and remove our emotions from trading. The best way to do this is to set up your trade with Stop-Loss and Limit orders from the beginning. This will allow you to use the proper reward/risk ratio (1:1 or higher) from the outset, and to stick to it. Once you set them, don’t touch them (One exception: you can move your stop in your favor to lock in profits as the market moves in your favor). Managing your risk in this way is a part of what many traders call “money management”. Many of the most successful forex traders are right about the market’s direction less than half the time. Since they practice good money management, they cut their losses quickly and let their profits run, so they are still profitable in their overall trading. Does Using 1:1 Reward to Risk Really Work? Our data certainly suggest it does. We use our data on our top 15 currency pairs to determine which trader accounts closed their Average Gain at least as large as their Average Loss—or a minimum Reward:Risk of 1:1. Were traders ultimately profitable if they stuck to this rule? Past performance is not indicative of future results, but the results certainly support it. Our data shows that 53 percent of all accounts which operated on at least a 1:1 Reward to Risk ratio turned a net-profit in our 12-month sample period. Those under 1:1? A mere 17 percent. Traders who adhered to this rule were 3 times more likely to turn a profit over the course of these 12 months—a substantial difference. Why Do Many Forex Traders Lose Money? Here is the Number 1 Mistake David Rodriguez 11-14 minutes We look through 43 million real trades to measure trader performance Majority of trades are successful and yet traders are losing Reward to Risk ratios play a vital role in capital preservation Why do major currency moves bring increased trader losses? To find out, the DailyFX research team has looked through over 40 million real trades placed via a major FX broker's trading platforms. In this article, we look at the biggest mistake that forex traders make, and a way to trade appropriately. Why Does the Average Forex Trader Lose Money? The average forex trader loses money, which is in itself a very discouraging fact. But why? Put simply, human psychology makes trading difficult. We looked at over 43 million real trades placed on a major FX broker's trading servers from Q2, 2014 – Q1, 2015 and came to some very interesting conclusions. The first is encouraging: traders make money most of the time as over 50% of trades are closed out at a gain. Percent of All Trades Closed Out at a Gain and Loss per Currency Pair   Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart shows results of over 43 million trades conducted by these traders worldwide from Q2, 2014 through Q1, 2015 across the 15 most popular currency pairs. The blue bar shows the percentage of trades that ended with a profit for the trader. Red shows the percentage of trades that ended in loss. For example, the Euro saw an impressive 61% of all trades closed out at a gain. And indeed every single one of these instruments saw the majority of traders turned a profit more than 50 percent of the time. If traders were right more than half of the time, why did most lose money? Average Profit/Loss per Winning and Losing Trades per Currency Pair Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. The above chart says it all. In blue, it shows the average number of pips traders earned on profitable trades. In red, it shows the average number of pips lost in losing trades. We can now clearly see why traders lose money despite being right more than half the time. They lose more money on their losing trades than they make on their winning trades. Let’s use EUR/USD as an example. We see that EUR/USD trades were closed out at a profit 61% of the time, but the average losing trade was worth 83 pips while the average winner was only 48 pips. Traders were correct more than half the time, but they lost over 70% more on their losing trades as they won on winning trades. The track record for the volatile GBP/USD pair was even worse. Traders captured profits on 59% of all GBP/USD trades. Yet they overall lost money as they turned an average 43 pip profit on each winner and lost 83 pips on losing trades. What gives? Identifying that there is a problem is important in itself, but we’ll need to understand the reasons behind it in order to look for a solution. Cut Losses, Let Profits Run – Why is this So Difficult to Do? In our study we saw that traders were very good at identifying profitable trading opportunities--closing trades out at a profit over 50 percent of the time. They utlimately lost, however, as the average loss far outweighed the gain. Open nearly any book on trading and the advice is the same: cut your losses early and let your profits run. When your trade goes against you, close it out. Take the small loss and then try again later, if appropriate. It is better to take a small loss early than a big loss later. If a trade is in your favor, let it run. It is often tempting to close out at a small gain in order to protect profits, but oftentimes we see that patience can result in greater gains. But if the solution is so simple, why is the issue so common? The simple answer: human nature. In fact this is not at all limited to trading. To further illustrate the point we draw on significant findings in psychology. A Simple Wager – Understanding Human Behavior Towards Winning and Losing What if I offered you a simple wager on a coin flip? You have two choices. Choice A means you have a 50% chance of winning 1000 dollars and 50% chance of winning nothing. Choice B is a flat 450 point gain. Which would you choose?         Expected Return Gains Choice A 50% chance to Win 1000 50% chance to Win 0 Expect to win $500 over time   Choice B Win 450   Win $450 Over time it makes sense to take Choice A—the expected gain of $500 is greater than the fixed $450. Yet many studies have shown that most people will consistently choose Choice B. Let’s flip the wager and run it again.         Expected Return Losses Choice A 50% chance to Lose 1000 50% chance to Lose 0 Expect to lose $500 over time   Choice B Lose 450   Lose $450 In this case we can expect to lose less money via Choice B, but in fact studies have shown that the majority of people will pick choice A every single time. Here we see the issue. Most people avoid risk when it comes to taking profits but then actively seek it if it means avoiding a loss. Why? Losses Hurt Psychologically far more than Gains Give Pleasure – Prospect Theory Nobel prize-winning clinical psychologist Daniel Kahneman based on his research on decision making. His work wasn’t on trading per se but clear implications for trade management and is quite relevant to FX trading. His study on Prospect Theory attempted to model and predict choices people would make between scenarios involving known risks and rewards. The findings showed something remarkably simple yet profound: most people took more pain from losses than pleasure from gains. It feels “good enough” to make $450 versus $500, but accepting a $500 loss hurts too much and many are willing to gamble that the trade turns around. This doesn’t make any sense from a trading perspective—500 dollars lost are equivalent to 500 dollars gained; one is not worth more than the other. Why should we then act so differently? Prospect Theory: Losses Typically Hurt Far More than Gains Give Pleasure Taking a purely rational approach to markets means treating a 50 point gain as morally equivalent to a 50 point loss. Unfortunately our data on real trader behavior suggests that the majority can’t do this. We need to think more systematically to improve our chances at success. Avoid the Common Pitfall Avoiding the loss-making problem described above is very simple in theory: gain more in each winning trade than you give back in each losing trade. But how might we do it concretely? When trading, always follow one simple rule: always seek a bigger reward than the loss you are risking. This is a valuable piece of advice that can be found in almost every trading book. Typically, this is called a “reward/risk ratio”. If you risk losing the same number of pips as you hope to gain, then your reward/risk ratio is 1-to-1 (also written 1:1). If you target a profit of 80 pips with a risk of 40 pips, then you have a 2:1 reward/risk ratio. If you follow this simple rule, you can be right on the direction of only half of your trades and still make money because you will earn more profits on your winning trades than losses on your losing trades. What ratio should you use? It depends on the type of trade you are making. We recommend to always use a minimum 1:1 ratio. That way, if you are right only half the time, you will at least break even. Certain strategies and trading techniques tend to produce high winning percentages as we saw with real trader data. If this is the case, it is possible to use a lower reward/risk ratio—such as between 1:1 and 2:1. For lower probability trading, a higher reward/risk ratio is recommended, such as 2:1, 3:1, or even 4:1. Remember, the higher the reward/risk ratio you choose, the less often you need to correctly predict market direction in order to make money trading. We will discuss different trading techniques in further detail in subsequent installments of this series. Stick to Your Plan: Use Stops and Limits Once you have a trading plan that uses a proper reward/risk ratio, the next challenge is to stick to the plan. Remember, it is natural for humans to want to hold on to losses and take profits early, but it makes for bad trading. We must overcome this natural tendency and remove our emotions from trading. The best way to do this is to set up your trade with Stop-Loss and Limit orders from the beginning. This will allow you to use the proper reward/risk ratio (1:1 or higher) from the outset, and to stick to it. Once you set them, don’t touch them (One exception: you can move your stop in your favor to lock in profits as the market moves in your favor). Managing your risk in this way is a part of what many traders call “money management”. Many of the most successful forex traders are right about the market’s direction less than half the time. Since they practice good money management, they cut their losses quickly and let their profits run, so they are still profitable in their overall trading. Does Using 1:1 Reward to Risk Really Work? Our data certainly suggest it does. We use our data on our top 15 currency pairs to determine which trader accounts closed their Average Gain at least as large as their Average Loss—or a minimum Reward:Risk of 1:1. Were traders ultimately profitable if they stuck to this rule? Past performance is not indicative of future results, but the results certainly support it. Our data shows that 53 percent of all accounts which operated on at least a 1:1 Reward to Risk ratio turned a net-profit in our 12-month sample period. Those under 1:1? A mere 17 percent. Traders who adhered to this rule were 3 times more likely to turn a profit over the course of these 12 months—a substantial difference. dont forget- like subscribe Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Game Plan: What Strategy Can I Use? Trade forex with stops and limits set to a risk/reward ratio of 1:1 or higher Whenever you place a trade, make sure that you use a stop-loss order. Always make sure that your profit target is at least as far away from your entry price as your stop-loss is. You can certainly set your price target higher, and probably should aim for at least 1:1 regardless of strategy, potentially 2:1 or more in certain circumstances. Then you can choose the market direction correctly only half the time and still make money in your account. The actual distance you place your stops and limits will depend on the conditions in the market at the time, such as volatility, currency pair, and where you see support and resistance. You can apply the same reward/risk ratio to any trade. If you have a stop level 40 pips away from entry, you should have a profit target 40 pips or more away. If you have a stop level 500 pips away, your profit target should be at least 500 pips away. We will use this as a basis for further study on real trader behavior as we look to uncover the traits of successful traders. *Data is drawn from FXCM Inc. accounts excluding Eligible Contract Participants, Clearing Accounts, Hong Kong, and Japan subsidiaries from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Interested in developing your own strategy? On page 2 of our Building Confidence in Trading Guide, we help you identify your trading style and create your own trading plan. View the next articles in the Traits of Successful Series: Trading Leverage - A Real Look at How Traders May Use it Effectively Do the Hours I Trade Matter? Yes - Quite a Bit Analysis prepared and written by David Rodriguez, Quantitative Strategist for DailyFX.com Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Game Plan: What Strategy Can I Use? Trade forex with stops and limits set to a risk/reward ratio of 1:1 or higher Whenever you place a trade, make sure that you use a stop-loss order. Always make sure that your profit target is at least as far away from your entry price as your stop-loss is. You can certainly set your price target higher, and probably should aim for at least 1:1 regardless of strategy, potentially 2:1 or more in certain circumstances. Then you can choose the market direction correctly only half the time and still make money in your account. The actual distance you place your stops and limits will depend on the conditions in the market at the time, such as volatility, currency pair, and where you see support and resistance. You can apply the same reward/risk ratio to any trade. If you have a stop level 40 pips away from entry, you should have a profit target 40 pips or more away. If you have a stop level 500 pips away, your profit target should be at least 500 pips away. We will use this as a basis for further study on real trader behavior as we look to uncover the traits of successful traders. *Data is drawn from FXCM Inc. accounts excluding Eligible Contract Participants, Clearing Accounts, Hong Kong, and Japan subsidiaries from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Interested in developing your own strategy? On page 2 of our Building Confidence in Trading Guide, we help you identify your trading style and create your own trading plan. View the next articles in the Traits of Successful Series: Trading Leverage - A Real Look at How Traders May Use it Effectively Do the Hours I Trade Matter? Yes - Quite a Bit Analysis prepared and written by David Rodriguez, Quantitative Strategist for DailyFX.com   Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Game Plan: What Strategy Can I Use? Trade forex with stops and limits set to a risk/reward ratio of 1:1 or higher Whenever you place a trade, make sure that you use a stop-loss order. Always make sure that your profit target is at least as far away from your entry price as your stop-loss is. You can certainly set your price target higher, and probably should aim for at least 1:1 regardless of strategy, potentially 2:1 or more in certain circumstances. Then you can choose the market direction correctly only half the time and still make money in your account. The actual distance you place your stops and limits will depend on the conditions in the market at the time, such as volatility, currency pair, and where you see support and resistance. You can apply the same reward/risk ratio to any trade. If you have a stop level 40 pips away from entry, you should have a profit target 40 pips or more away. If you have a stop level 500 pips away, your profit target should be at least 500 pips away. We will use this as a basis for further study on real trader behavior as we look to uncover the traits of successful traders. *Data is drawn from FXCM Inc. accounts excluding Eligible Contract Participants, Clearing Accounts, Hong Kong, and Japan subsidiaries from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Interested in developing your own strategy? On page 2 of our Building Confidence in Trading Guide, we help you identify your trading style and create your own trading plan. View the next articles in the Traits of Successful Series: Trading Leverage - A Real Look at How Traders May Use it Effectively Do the Hours I Trade Matter? Yes - Quite a Bit Analysis prepared and written by David Rodriguez, Quantitative Strategist for DailyFX.com   Data source: Derived from data from a major FX broker* across 15 most traded currency pairs from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Game Plan: What Strategy Can I Use? Trade forex with stops and limits set to a risk/reward ratio of 1:1 or higher Whenever you place a trade, make sure that you use a stop-loss order. Always make sure that your profit target is at least as far away from your entry price as your stop-loss is. You can certainly set your price target higher, and probably should aim for at least 1:1 regardless of strategy, potentially 2:1 or more in certain circumstances. Then you can choose the market direction correctly only half the time and still make money in your account. The actual distance you place your stops and limits will depend on the conditions in the market at the time, such as volatility, currency pair, and where you see support and resistance. You can apply the same reward/risk ratio to any trade. If you have a stop level 40 pips away from entry, you should have a profit target 40 pips or more away. If you have a stop level 500 pips away, your profit target should be at least 500 pips away. We will use this as a basis for further study on real trader behavior as we look to uncover the traits of successful traders. *Data is drawn from FXCM Inc. accounts excluding Eligible Contract Participants, Clearing Accounts, Hong Kong, and Japan subsidiaries from 3/1/2014 to 3/31/2015. Interested in developing your own strategy? On page 2 of our Building Confidence in Trading Guide, we help you identify your trading style and create your own trading plan. View the next articles in the Traits of Successful Series: Trading Leverage - A Real Look at How Traders May Use it Effectively Do the Hours I Trade Matter? Yes - Quite a Bit Analysis prepared and written by David Rodriguez, Quantitative Strategist for DailyFX.com     View the next articles in the Traits of Successful Series: Trading Leverage - A Real Look at How Traders May Use it Effectively Do the Hours I Trade Matter? Yes - Quite a Bit Analysis prepared and written by David Rodriguez, Quantitative Strategist for DailyFX.com
    • Waiting for one constructive comment from you guys..anyone dont forget to like and subscribe
    • enjoy.. good profits in forex dont forget to like and subscribe          
    • try again..   1. MakingMoneyin ForexTradingTheForexmarkethasadailyvolumeofover $4trillionper day,dwarfingthevolumeof theequityandfuturesmarketscombined.Thousands ofpeople,allover theworld,are tradingForexandmakingtonsofmoney.Whynotyou?All youneedtostarttradingForexis acomputer andanInternetconnection.Youcan doitfrom thecomfortofyour home,inyour sparetimewithoutleavingyour dayjob. Andyoudon'tneedalargesum ofmoneytostart,youcantradeinitially withaminimal sum,or betteroff,youcanstartpracticingwithademoaccountwithouttheneedto depositanymoney.OnceyouconsiderstartingForextrading,oneofthefirstthings youneedtodois chooseabroker,choosingareliablebroker is thesinglemostcriticalfactor toForex success.We currently trade at eToro platform. After testing several Forex platforms we find this one to be the best. What made the difference is a unique feature that allow us to watch and copy the strategies and trades of the best performing traders on the platform. You can actually see each move the "Guru" traders make. This method works nicely for us. Since we started trading at this broker we noticed an increase of our successful trades and profits when compared to our former brokers. You may want to check them out.Please note that all trading involves risk. Only risk capital you're prepared to lose. Past performance does not guarantee future results. This post is for educational purposes and should not be considered as investment advice.NowIwouldstronglyencourageyoutogoandvisittheabovebroker's siterightnow evenifyouarenotyetdecidedwhether youwanttogointoForextrading.Why? Becauseitprovides tons offreeeducationmaterials,videosandbestofall ademo accountthatallows youtopracticeForextradingforfreewithouttheneedtodeposit anymoney.Simplygotothesite,registerforafreeaccountandstart"trading"-by actuallypracticingandexperiencingitfirsthandyou'll beabletodecidewhether Forex tradingisfor you.Inanycase,beforestartingtotradefor real,itis advisablethatyoupracticewithademo account.Onceyoubuildsomeskill andfeelmorecomfortablewiththesystemyou can starttradinggraduallyfor real money.GotoTo2.WhatisForexTradingForeignexchange,popularlyknownas 'Forex'or 'FX',is thetradeofasinglecurrency for another atadecidedtradepriceontheover-the-counter (OTC)marketplace.Forex is definitelytheworld's mosttradedmarket,havinganaverageturnover ofmorethan US$4trillioneachday.ComparethistotheNewYork Stock Exchange,thathasadailyturnover ofabout US$70billionanditisveryobvious howtheForexmarketisdefinitelythelargest financialmarketontheglobe.Inessence,Forexcurrencytradingis theactofsimultaneouslypurchasingoneforeign currencywhilstsellinganother,mainlyfor thepurposeofspeculation.Foreigncurrency values increase(appreciate) anddrop(depreciate) towards oneanother asaresultof varietyoffactors suchas economics andgeopolitics.ThenormalobjectiveofFXtraders is tomakemoneyfrom thesetypes ofchanges inthevalueofoneforeigncurrency againstanother byactivelyspeculatingonwhichwayforeignexchangerates arelikelytoturninthefuture.Incontrasttothemajorityoffinancialmarkets,theOTC (over-the-counter) currency marketsdoes nothaveanyphysical placeormainexchangeandtrades 24-hours every dayviaaworldwidesystem ofcompanies,financial institutionsandindividuals.Because ofthis,currencyratesarecontinuouslyrisingandfallinginvaluetowards oneanother, providingnumerous tradingchoices.Oneoftheimportantelements regardingForex's popularityis thefactthatcurrency tradingmarkets usuallyareavailable24-hours adayfromSundayeveningrightthrough toFridaynight.Buyingandsellingfollows theclock,beginningonMondaymorningin Wellington,NewZealand,movingontoAsiantradespearheadedfrom Tokyoand Singapore,aheadofgoingtoLondonandconcludingonFridayeveninginNewYork.Thefactthatprices areavailabletodeal 24-hours dailymakes certainthatprice gapping(whenever apriceleapsfrom onelevel toanother withnotradingbetween) is less andmakes surethattraders couldtakeapositioneachtimetheydesire, irrespectiveoftime,eventhoughinrealitythereareparticular 'lull' occasions when volumes tendtobebelowtheir dailyaveragewhichcouldwidenmarketspreads.Forexis aleveraged(or margined) item,whichmeansthatyouaresimplyrequiredto putinasmall percentageofthefull valueofyour positiontosetaforeignexchange trade.Becauseofthis,thechanceofprofit,orloss,fromyour primarymoneyoutlayis considerablygreater thaninconventional trading.Currencies aredesignatedbythreeletter symbols.Thestandardsymbolsfor someof themostcommonlytradedcurrencies are: EUR –EuUSD –UnitedStatesdollar CAD –Canadiandollar GBP–BritishpoundJPY–JapaneseYen AUD –Australiandollar CHF –Swiss francForextransactionsarequotedinpairsbecauseyouarebuyingonecurrencywhile sellinganother.Thefirstcurrencyis thebasecurrencyandthesecondcurrencyis the quotecurrency.Theprice,or rate,thatis quotedistheamountofthesecondcurrencyrequiredto purchaseoneunitofthefirstcurrency.For example,ifEUR/USD has anask priceof1.2327,youcanbuyoneEurofor 1.2327USdollars.Thereareso-calledmajors,for whicharound75%ofallmarketoperations onForexare held:theEUR/USD,GBP/USD,USD/CHF,andUSD/JPY.Aswesee,theUSdollar is representedinall currencypairs,thus,ifacurrencypair contains theUSdollar,this pair is consideredamajorcurrencypair.Pairs whichdonotincludetheUSdollar arecalled cross currencypairs,or cross rates.Thefollowingcross rates arethemostactively traded:EUR/CHF = euro-franc EUR/GBP= euro-sterling EUR/JPY= euro-Yen GBP/JPY= sterling-Yen AUD/JPY= aussie-Yen NZD/JPY= kiwi-YenTogiveyouatasteofwhatis happeningintheForexarenaherearesomehistoricalForexevents.Oneofthemostinterestingmovements intheForexmarketinvolvingtheBritishpound tookplaceintheSeptember16,1992.Thatdayis knownas BlackWednesdaywiththe BritishPoundpostingits biggestfall.Itwas mostlyseenintheGBP/DEM (BritishPound vs.theDeutschemark)andtheGBP/USD (BritishPoundvs.theUSdollar) currency pairs.ThefalloftheBritishpoundagainsttheUSdollar intheperiodfrom November toDecember 1992constituted25%(from2.01to1.51GBThegeneral reasonsfor this "sterlingcrisis"aresaidtobetheparticipationofGreat BritainintheEuropeancurrencysystemwithfixedexchangeratecorridors;recently passedparliamentaryelections;areductionintheBritishindustrialoutput;theBank of Englandeffortstoholdtheparityratefor theDeutschemark,as well as adramatic outflowofinvestors.Atthesametime,duetoaprofitabilityslant,theGermancurrency marketbecamemoreattractivethantheBritishone.All inall,thespeculators were rushingtosellpoundsfor Deutschemarks andfor USdollars.Theconsequencesofthis currencycrisiswereas follows:asharpincreaseintheBritishinterestratefrom 10%to15%,theBritishGovernmenthadtoacceptpounddevaluationandtosecedefrom the EuropeanMonetarySystem.Asaresult,thepoundreturnedtoafloatingexchange rate.Another intriguingcurrencypair is theUSdollar vs.theJapaneseYen(USD/JPY).The USdollar andJapaneseYenis thethirdonthelistofmosttradedcurrencypairs after theEUR/USDandGBP/USD.Itistradedmostactivelyduringsessions inAsia. Movementsofthis pairareusuallysmooth;theUSD/JPYpair quicklyreacts totherisk peakingoffinancialmarkets.From themid80's theYenratings startedrisingactively versus theUSDollar.Intheearly90's aprosperouseconomic developmentturnedinto astandstill inJapan,theunemploymentincreased;earnings andwages slidas well as thelivingstandardsoftheJapanesepopulation.Andfrom thebeginningoftheyear1991,this causedbankruptcies ofnumerousfinancialorganizationsinJapan.As a consequence,thequotes ontheTokyoStockExchangecollapsed,aYendevaluation tookplace,thereafter,anewwaveofbankruptcies amongmanufacturingcompanies began.In1995ahistorical lowoftheUSD/JPYpair was recordedat-79.80.TheabovestartedanAsiancrisis intheyears1997-1998thatledaYencrash.It resultedinatumbleoftheYen-USdollar pair from 115YensforoneUSdollar to150.Theglobaleconomic crisis touchedalmostall fields ofhumanactivities.Forexcurrency marketwas noexception.Though,Forexparticipants (central banks,commercialbanks, investmentbanks,brokers anddealers,pensionfunds,insurancecompaniesand transnational companies) wereinadifficultposition,theForexmarketcontinues to functionsuccessfully,itis astableandprofitableasnever before.Thefinancial crisis of2007has ledtodrasticchanges intheworld's currencies values. Duringthecrisis,theYenstrengthenedmostofall againstall other currencies.Neither theUSdollar,nor theeuro,buttheYenprovedtobethemostreliablecurrency instrumentfor traders.Oneofthereasonsforsuchstrengtheningcanbeattributedto thefactthattraders neededtofindasanctuaryamidamonetarychaos.Askand BidWhentraders wanttoplaceanorder ontheForexmarkettheyshouldbeawareofthe currencypair as well as thepriceofthispair.AForexmarketpriceofacurrencypair is denotedbytwosymbols,Ask andBid,whichhavespecific digitAsk priceis thehighestpriceinthepair’s quotationatwhichatrader buys thecurrency, standingfirstintheabbreviationofthecurrencypair.Consequently,atrader sells the currencystandingsecond.Bidpriceis thelowestpriceinthequotationofthecurrencypair,atwhichatrader sells thecurrencystandingfirstintheabbreviationofthecurrencypair.Respectively,atrader buys thecurrencystandingsecond.Seemcomplicated?here'sanexample:Let's assumethatwehavethecurrencypair ofEUR/USD withthequotationof1.3652/1.3655.Thismeansthatyoucanbuy1eurofor1.3655dollars or tosell1euro for 1.3652dollars.ThedifferencebetweentheBidpriceandtheAsk priceis called spread.Thespreadisactually thecommissionofthebroker.TheSpreadsinForextradingare actuallyverysmall comparedtocurrencyspreads atbanks.Aterm thatyou'll seealotwhiletradingForexis "pip"and"pips"-a“pip” standsfor “PercentageinPoint”.Apipis thesmallestpricemovementofatradedcurrency.Itis alsoreferredtoasa“point”.Itis veryimportantthatyouunderstandwhatapipis inthe Forextradingbecauseyouwill beusingpips incalculatingyour profits andlosses..For mostcurrenciesapipis 0.0001or 1/100ofacent.Whenacurrencymovesfromavalueof1.2911to1.2914,itmoved3pips.Whenapip has avalueof$10,youhavegained$30.Thereis anexceptionfor quotationsfor JapaneseYenagainstothercurrencies.For currencies inrelationtoJapaneseYenapipis 0.01or 1cent.Another termthatyou'll needtounderstandinrelationtoForextradingis “Lots”.Alotis theminimal tradedamountfor eachcurrencytransaction.For regular accounts onelot equals 100,000unitsofthebasecurrency.Howeveryoucanalsoopenminiandmicro accounts thatallowtradinginsmaller lots.Understanding thePip Spread -Thespreadis closelyassociatedwiththepipandhas amajor importanceforyouas atrader.Asmentionedabove,Itis thedifferencebetweenthesellingandthebuyingpriceofacurrencypair.Itis thedifferenceinthebid andask price.Theaskis thepriceatwhichyoubuyandthebidis thepriceatwhichyousell.SupposetheEUR/USDis quotedat1.4502bidand1.4505ask.Inthis casethespread is 3pips.Thepipspreadis your costofdoingbusiness here.Inthecaseaboveitmeans yousustainapaper lossequal to3pips atthemomentyouenter thetrade.Your contracthastoappreciateby3pipsbeforeyoubreakeven.Thelower thepipspreadtheeasier is itfor youtoprofit.Generallythemoreactiveandbigger themarket,thelower thepipspread.Smaller and moreexotic markets tendtohaveahigher spread.Mostbrokers willbeofferingdiffere thats better dont forget to like and subscribe  
    • or how about... 1. MakingMoneyin ForexTradingTheForexmarkethasadailyvolumeofover $4trillionper day,dwarfingthevolumeof theequityandfuturesmarketscombined.Thousands ofpeople,allover theworld,are tradingForexandmakingtonsofmoney.Whynotyou?All youneedtostarttradingForexis acomputer andanInternetconnection.Youcan doitfrom thecomfortofyour home,inyour sparetimewithoutleavingyour dayjob. Andyoudon'tneedalargesum ofmoneytostart,youcantradeinitially withaminimal sum,or betteroff,youcanstartpracticingwithademoaccountwithouttheneedto depositanymoney.OnceyouconsiderstartingForextrading,oneofthefirstthings youneedtodois chooseabroker,choosingareliablebroker is thesinglemostcriticalfactor toForex success.We currently trade at eToro platform. After testing several Forex platforms we find this one to be the best. What made the difference is a unique feature that allow us to watch and copy the strategies and trades of the best performing traders on the platform. You can actually see each move the "Guru" traders make. This method works nicely for us. Since we started trading at this broker we noticed an increase of our successful trades and profits when compared to our former brokers. You may want to check them out.Please note that all trading involves risk. Only risk capital you're prepared to lose. Past performance does not guarantee future results. This post is for educational purposes and should not be considered as investment advice.NowIwouldstronglyencourageyoutogoandvisittheabovebroker's siterightnow evenifyouarenotyetdecidedwhether youwanttogointoForextrading.Why? Becauseitprovides tons offreeeducationmaterials,videosandbestofall ademo accountthatallows youtopracticeForextradingforfreewithouttheneedtodeposit anymoney.Simplygotothesite,registerforafreeaccountandstart"trading"-by actuallypracticingandexperiencingitfirsthandyou'll beabletodecidewhether Forex tradingisfor you.Inanycase,beforestartingtotradefor real,itis advisablethatyoupracticewithademo account.Onceyoubuildsomeskill andfeelmorecomfortablewiththesystemyou can starttradinggraduallyfor real money.GotoTop           2.WhatisForexTradingForeignexchange,popularlyknownas 'Forex'or 'FX',is thetradeofasinglecurrency for another atadecidedtradepriceontheover-the-counter (OTC)marketplace.Forex is definitelytheworld's mosttradedmarket,havinganaverageturnover ofmorethan US$4trillioneachday.ComparethistotheNewYork Stock Exchange,thathasadailyturnover ofabout US$70billionanditisveryobvious howtheForexmarketisdefinitelythelargest financialmarketontheglobe.Inessence,Forexcurrencytradingis theactofsimultaneouslypurchasingoneforeign currencywhilstsellinganother,mainlyfor thepurposeofspeculation.Foreigncurrency values increase(appreciate) anddrop(depreciate) towards oneanother asaresultof varietyoffactors suchas economics andgeopolitics.ThenormalobjectiveofFXtraders is tomakemoneyfrom thesetypes ofchanges inthevalueofoneforeigncurrency againstanother byactivelyspeculatingonwhichwayforeignexchangerates arelikelytoturninthefuture.Incontrasttothemajorityoffinancialmarkets,theOTC (over-the-counter) currency marketsdoes nothaveanyphysical placeormainexchangeandtrades 24-hours every dayviaaworldwidesystem ofcompanies,financial institutionsandindividuals.Because ofthis,currencyratesarecontinuouslyrisingandfallinginvaluetowards oneanother, providingnumerous tradingchoices.Oneoftheimportantelements regardingForex's popularityis thefactthatcurrency tradingmarkets usuallyareavailable24-hours adayfromSundayeveningrightthrough toFridaynight.Buyingandsellingfollows theclock,beginningonMondaymorningin Wellington,NewZealand,movingontoAsiantradespearheadedfrom Tokyoand Singapore,aheadofgoingtoLondonandconcludingonFridayeveninginNewYork.Thefactthatprices areavailabletodeal 24-hours dailymakes certainthatprice gapping(whenever apriceleapsfrom onelevel toanother withnotradingbetween) is less andmakes surethattraders couldtakeapositioneachtimetheydesire, irrespectiveoftime,eventhoughinrealitythereareparticular 'lull' occasions when volumes tendtobebelowtheir dailyaveragewhichcouldwidenmarketspreads.Forexis aleveraged(or margined) item,whichmeansthatyouaresimplyrequiredto putinasmall percentageofthefull valueofyour positiontosetaforeignexchange trade.Becauseofthis,thechanceofprofit,orloss,fromyour primarymoneyoutlayis considerablygreater thaninconventional trading.Currencies aredesignatedbythreeletter symbols.Thestandardsymbolsfor someof themostcommonlytradedcurrencies are: EUR –Euros   USD –UnitedStatesdollar CAD –Canadiandollar GBP–BritishpoundJPY–JapaneseYen AUD –Australiandollar CHF –Swiss francForextransactionsarequotedinpairsbecauseyouarebuyingonecurrencywhile sellinganother.Thefirstcurrencyis thebasecurrencyandthesecondcurrencyis the quotecurrency.Theprice,or rate,thatis quotedistheamountofthesecondcurrencyrequiredto purchaseoneunitofthefirstcurrency.For example,ifEUR/USD has anask priceof1.2327,youcanbuyoneEurofor 1.2327USdollars.Thereareso-calledmajors,for whicharound75%ofallmarketoperations onForexare held:theEUR/USD,GBP/USD,USD/CHF,andUSD/JPY.Aswesee,theUSdollar is representedinall currencypairs,thus,ifacurrencypair contains theUSdollar,this pair is consideredamajorcurrencypair.Pairs whichdonotincludetheUSdollar arecalled cross currencypairs,or cross rates.Thefollowingcross rates arethemostactively traded:EUR/CHF = euro-franc EUR/GBP= euro-sterling EUR/JPY= euro-Yen GBP/JPY= sterling-Yen AUD/JPY= aussie-Yen NZD/JPY= kiwi-YenTogiveyouatasteofwhatis happeningintheForexarenaherearesomehistoricalForexevents.Oneofthemostinterestingmovements intheForexmarketinvolvingtheBritishpound tookplaceintheSeptember16,1992.Thatdayis knownas BlackWednesdaywiththe BritishPoundpostingits biggestfall.Itwas mostlyseenintheGBP/DEM (BritishPound vs.theDeutschemark)andtheGBP/USD (BritishPoundvs.theUSdollar) currency pairs.ThefalloftheBritishpoundagainsttheUSdollar intheperiodfrom November toDecember 1992constituted25%(from2.01to1.51GBP/USD).     Thegeneral reasonsfor this "sterlingcrisis"aresaidtobetheparticipationofGreat BritainintheEuropeancurrencysystemwithfixedexchangeratecorridors;recently passedparliamentaryelections;areductionintheBritishindustrialoutput;theBank of Englandeffortstoholdtheparityratefor theDeutschemark,as well as adramatic outflowofinvestors.Atthesametime,duetoaprofitabilityslant,theGermancurrency marketbecamemoreattractivethantheBritishone.All inall,thespeculators were rushingtosellpoundsfor Deutschemarks andfor USdollars.Theconsequencesofthis currencycrisiswereas follows:asharpincreaseintheBritishinterestratefrom 10%to15%,theBritishGovernmenthadtoacceptpounddevaluationandtosecedefrom the EuropeanMonetarySystem.Asaresult,thepoundreturnedtoafloatingexchange rate.Another intriguingcurrencypair is theUSdollar vs.theJapaneseYen(USD/JPY).The USdollar andJapaneseYenis thethirdonthelistofmosttradedcurrencypairs after theEUR/USDandGBP/USD.Itistradedmostactivelyduringsessions inAsia. Movementsofthis pairareusuallysmooth;theUSD/JPYpair quicklyreacts totherisk peakingoffinancialmarkets.From themid80's theYenratings startedrisingactively versus theUSDollar.Intheearly90's aprosperouseconomic developmentturnedinto astandstill inJapan,theunemploymentincreased;earnings andwages slidas well as thelivingstandardsoftheJapanesepopulation.Andfrom thebeginningoftheyear1991,this causedbankruptcies ofnumerousfinancialorganizationsinJapan.As a consequence,thequotes ontheTokyoStockExchangecollapsed,aYendevaluation tookplace,thereafter,anewwaveofbankruptcies amongmanufacturingcompanies began.In1995ahistorical lowoftheUSD/JPYpair was recordedat-79.80.TheabovestartedanAsiancrisis intheyears1997-1998thatledaYencrash.It resultedinatumbleoftheYen-USdollar pair from 115YensforoneUSdollar to150.Theglobaleconomic crisis touchedalmostall fields ofhumanactivities.Forexcurrency marketwas noexception.Though,Forexparticipants (central banks,commercialbanks, investmentbanks,brokers anddealers,pensionfunds,insurancecompaniesand transnational companies) wereinadifficultposition,theForexmarketcontinues to functionsuccessfully,itis astableandprofitableasnever before.Thefinancial crisis of2007has ledtodrasticchanges intheworld's currencies values. Duringthecrisis,theYenstrengthenedmostofall againstall other currencies.Neither theUSdollar,nor theeuro,buttheYenprovedtobethemostreliablecurrency instrumentfor traders.Oneofthereasonsforsuchstrengtheningcanbeattributedto thefactthattraders neededtofindasanctuaryamidamonetarychaos.Askand BidWhentraders wanttoplaceanorder ontheForexmarkettheyshouldbeawareofthe currencypair as well as thepriceofthispair.AForexmarketpriceofacurrencypair is denotedbytwosymbols,Ask andBid,whichhavespecific digital notations.     Ask priceis thehighestpriceinthepair’s quotationatwhichatrader buys thecurrency, standingfirstintheabbreviationofthecurrencypair.Consequently,atrader sells the currencystandingsecond.Bidpriceis thelowestpriceinthequotationofthecurrencypair,atwhichatrader sells thecurrencystandingfirstintheabbreviationofthecurrencypair.Respectively,atrader buys thecurrencystandingsecond.Seemcomplicated?here'sanexample:Let's assumethatwehavethecurrencypair ofEUR/USD withthequotationof1.3652/1.3655.Thismeansthatyoucanbuy1eurofor1.3655dollars or tosell1euro for 1.3652dollars.ThedifferencebetweentheBidpriceandtheAsk priceis called spread.Thespreadisactually thecommissionofthebroker.TheSpreadsinForextradingare actuallyverysmall comparedtocurrencyspreads atbanks.Aterm thatyou'll seealotwhiletradingForexis "pip"and"pips"-a“pip” standsfor “PercentageinPoint”.Apipis thesmallestpricemovementofatradedcurrency.Itis alsoreferredtoasa“point”.Itis veryimportantthatyouunderstandwhatapipis inthe Forextradingbecauseyouwill beusingpips incalculatingyour profits andlosses..For mostcurrenciesapipis 0.0001or 1/100ofacent.Whenacurrencymovesfromavalueof1.2911to1.2914,itmoved3pips.Whenapip has avalueof$10,youhavegained$30.Thereis anexceptionfor quotationsfor JapaneseYenagainstothercurrencies.For currencies inrelationtoJapaneseYenapipis 0.01or 1cent.Another termthatyou'll needtounderstandinrelationtoForextradingis “Lots”.Alotis theminimal tradedamountfor eachcurrencytransaction.For regular accounts onelot equals 100,000unitsofthebasecurrency.Howeveryoucanalsoopenminiandmicro accounts thatallowtradinginsmaller lots.Understanding thePip Spread -Thespreadis closelyassociatedwiththepipandhas amajor importanceforyouas atrader.Asmentionedabove,Itis thedifferencebetweenthesellingandthebuyingpriceofacurrencypair.Itis thedifferenceinthebid andask price.Theaskis thepriceatwhichyoubuyandthebidis thepriceatwhichyousell.SupposetheEUR/USDis quotedat1.4502bidand1.4505ask.Inthis casethespread is 3pips.Thepipspreadis your costofdoingbusiness here.Inthecaseaboveitmeans yousustainapaper lossequal to3pips atthemomentyouenter thetrade.Your contracthastoappreciateby3pipsbeforeyoubreakeven.Thelower thepipspreadtheeasier is itfor youtoprofit.Generallythemoreactiveandbigger themarket,thelower thepipspread.Smaller and moreexotic markets tendtohaveahigher spread.Mostbrokers willbeofferingdifferent  
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