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The World's 10 Most Famous Traders of All Time

(Iknow DAN BLYSTONE HE IS ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS AROUND.. ) https://www.investopedia.com/articles/active-trading/041515/worlds-10-most-famous-traders-all-time.asp

Updated Mar 12, 2019

There are several famous former traders who moved on to different careers, such as John Key (who served as the 38th Prime Minister of New Zealand) and Jimmy Wales (founder of Wikipedia). However, this list is made up of traders famous for being traders. The lives of the world's most famous traders are colored by both triumph and tragedy, with some exploits achieving mythological status within the industry. The list begins with legendary traders of history and progresses to those of the present day.

 

1. Jesse Livermore: Jesse Lauriston Livermore (1877–1940) was an American trader famous for both colossal gains and losses in the market. He successfully shorted the 1929 market crash, building his fortune to $100 million. However, by 1934 he had lost his money and tragically took his own life in 1940.

 

2. William Delbert Gann: WD Gann (1878–1955) was a trader who used market forecasting methods based on geometry, astrology, and ancient mathematics. His mysterious technical tools include Gann angles and the Square of 9. As well as trading, Gann wrote a number of books and courses.

 

3. George Soros: Hungarian-born George Soros (born 1930) is the chairman of Soros Fund Management, one of the most successful firms in the history of the hedge fund industry. He earned the moniker “The Man Who Broke the Bank of England” in 1992 after his short sale of $10 billion worth of pounds, yielding a tidy $1 billion profit. 

 

4. Jim Rogers: James Rogers, Jr. (born 1942) is the Chairman of Rogers Holdings. He co-founded the Quantum Fund along with George Soros in the early 1970s, which gained a staggering 4200% over 10 years. Rogers is renowned for his correct bullish call on commodities in the 1990's and also for his books detailing his adventurous world travels.

 

5. Richard Dennis: Richard J. Dennis (born 1949) made his mark in the trading world as a highly successful Chicago-based commodities trader. He reportedly acquired a $200 million fortune over ten years from his speculating. Along with partner William Eckhardt, Dennis was co-creator of the mythical Turtle Trading experiment. 

 

6. Paul Tudor Jones: Paul Tudor Jones II (born 1954) is the founder of Tudor Investment Corporation, one of the world's leading hedge funds. Tudor Jones gained notoriety after making around $100 million from shorting stocks during the 1987 market crash.

 

7. John Paulson: John Paulson (born 1955), of the hedge fund Paulson & Co., rose to the top of the financial world after making billions of dollars in 2007 by using credit default swaps to effectively sell short the US subprime mortgage lending market.

 

8. Steven Cohen: Steven Cohen (born 1956) founded SAC Capital Advisors, a leading hedge fund focused primarily on trading equities. In 2013, SAC was charged by the Securities and Exchange Commission with failing to prevent insider trading and later agreed to pay a $1.2 billion fine.

 

9. David Tepper: David Tepper (born 1957) is the founder of the wildly successful hedge fund Appaloosa Management. Tepper, a specialist in distressed debt investing, has made several appearances on CNBC where his statements are closely watched by traders.

 

10. Nick Leeson: Nicholas Leeson (born 1967) is the rogue trader who famously caused the collapse of Barings Bank. Leeson served four years in a Singapore jail but later bounced back to become CEO of Irish football club Galway United.

 

The Bottom Line

The dramatic and varied life stories of the world's most famous traders have made compelling material for books and movies. Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, a fictionalized portrayal of Jesse Livermore's life, is widely viewed as a timeless classic and one of the most important books ever written about trading. Rogue Trader (1999), starring Ewan McGregor, is based on the story of Nick Leeson and the collapse of Barings Bank. (For related reading, see "The Most Famous Forex Traders Ever.")

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Lauriston_Livermore

 

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learn from the best

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Lauriston_Livermore

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

Learn from the best

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

 

 

Jesse Lauriston Livermore (July 26, 1877 – November 28, 1940) was an American stock trader.[1] He is considered a pioneer of day trading[2] and was the basis for the main character of Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, a best-selling book by Edwin Lefèvre. At one time, he was one of the richest people in the world; however, at the time of his suicide, he had liabilities greater than his assets.[3]

In a time when accurate financial statements were rarely published, getting current stock quotes required a large operation, and market manipulation was rampant, Livermore used what is now known as technical analysis as the basis for his trades. His principles, including the effects of emotion on trading, continue to be studied.

Some of Livermore's trades, such as taking short positions before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and just before the Wall Street Crash of 1929, are legendary and have led to his being regarded as the greatest trader who ever lived.

 

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

Learn from the best

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

 

 

Jesse Lauriston Livermore (July 26, 1877 – November 28, 1940) was an American stock trader.[1] He is considered a pioneer of day trading[2] and was the basis for the main character of Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, a best-selling book by Edwin Lefèvre. At one time, he was one of the richest people in the world; however, at the time of his suicide, he had liabilities greater than his assets.[3]

In a time when accurate financial statements were rarely published, getting current stock quotes required a large operation, and market manipulation was rampant, Livermore used what is now known as technical analysis as the basis for his trades. His principles, including the effects of emotion on trading, continue to be studied.

Some of Livermore's trades, such as taking short positions before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and just before the Wall Street Crash of 1929, are legendary and have led to his being regarded as the greatest trader who ever lived.

 

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

Learn from the best

Livermore was born in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts to a poverty-stricken family and moved to Acton, Massachusetts, as a child.[4] Livermore learned to read and write at the age of 3 1/2.[5] At the age of 14, his father pulled him out of school to help with the farm; however, with his mother's blessing, Livermore ran away from home.[5] He then began his career by posting stock quotes at the Paine Webber stockbrokerage in Boston, earning $5 per week.[5]

Career

In 1892, at the age of 15, he bet $5 on Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad at a bucket shop, a type of establishment that took leveraged bets on stock prices but did not buy or sell the stock.[1] He earned $3.12 on the $5 bet.[5]

Livermore was soon earning more trading at the bucket shops than he did at Paine Webber. At the age of 16, he quit his job and began trading full-time.[5] He brought $1,000 home to his mother, who disapproved of his "gambling"; he countered that he was not gambling, but "speculating".[6]

Eventually, he was barred from his local bucket shops because of his consistent winning and would bet in the shops using disguises. He then went to Wall Street with his $10,000 in savings.[5]

While trading on Wall Street, he went bust as the ticker tape was not updated fast enough to make current trading decisions. He then moved to St. Louis, where he made bets at bucket shops.[5]

His first big win came in 1901 at the age of 24 when he bought stock in Northern Pacific Railway. He turned $10,000 into $500,000.[5]

In 1906, he vacationed in Palm Beach, Florida at the club of Edward R. Bradley.[5] While on vacation, at the direction of scalawag Thomas W. Lawson, he took a massive short position in Union Pacific Railroad the day before the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, leading to a $250,000 profit.[7] However, his friend, Edward Francis Hutton, incorrectly convinced Livermore not to close his position, and he wound up losing $40,000.[5]

In the Panic of 1907, Livermore's huge short positions made him $1 million in a single day.[5] However, his mentor, J. P. Morgan, who had bailed out the entire New York Stock Exchange during the crash, requested him to refrain from further short selling. Livermore agreed and instead, profited from the rebound, boosting his net worth to $3 million.[5]

He bought a $200,000 yacht, a rail car, and an apartment on the Upper West Side. He joined exclusive clubs and had mistresses.[5]

In 1908, he listened to Teddy Price, who told him to buy cotton, while Price secretly sold. He went bankrupt but was able to recover all of his losses.[5]

In 1915, he filed bankruptcy again.[8]

Following the end of World War I, Livermore secretly cornered the market in cotton. It was only interception by President Woodrow Wilson, prompted by a call from the United States Secretary of Agriculture, who asked him to the White House for a discussion that stopped his move. He agreed to sell back the cotton at break-even, thus preventing a troublesome rise in the price of cotton. When asked why he had cornered the cotton market, Livermore replied, "To see if I could, Mr. President."[9]

In 1924-1925, he engaged in market manipulation, making $10 million trading wheat and corn in a battle with Arthur W. Cutten[5] and engineering a short squeeze on the stock of Piggly Wiggly.[6]

In early 1929, he amassed huge short positions, using more than 100 stockbrokers to hide what he was doing. By the spring, he was down over $6 million on paper. However, upon the Wall Street Crash of 1929, he netted approximately $100 million.[5] Following a series of newspaper articles declaring him the "Great Bear of Wall Street", he was blamed for the crash by the public and received death threats, leading him to hire an armed bodyguard.[6]

His second divorce in 1932, the non-fatal shooting of his son by his wife in 1935, and a lawsuit from his Russian mistress led to a decline in his mental health, while the creation of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934 imposed new rules that affected his trading. Although it is unknown exactly how it happened,[9] he eventually lost his fortune and filed bankruptcy for the third time in 1934, listing assets of $84,000 and debts of $2.5 million.[6][5] He was suspended as a member of the Chicago Board of Trade on March 7, 1934.[9]

In 1937, he paid off his $800,000 tax bill.[10]

In 1939, he opened a financial advisory business, selling a technical analysis system.[6]

Personal life

One of Livermore's favorite books was Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, by Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. That was also a favorite book of Bernard Baruch, a stock trader and close friend of Livermore.[4]

He enjoyed fishing and, in 1937, he caught a 436 pound swordfish.[11]

Marriages

Livermore was married 3 times and had 2 children. He married his first wife, Netit (Nettie) Jordan, of Indianapolis, at the age of 23 in October 1900. They had only known each other a few weeks before they got married.[5] Less than a year later, he went broke after some bad trades; for a new stake, he asked her to pawn the substantial collection of jewelry he had bought her, but she refused, permanently damaging their relationship.[5] They separated soon thereafter and finally divorced in October 1917.[9]

On December 2, 1918, at the age of 40, Livermore married 22-year old Dorothea (Dorothy) Fox Wendt, a 23-year-old former Ziegfeld girl in Ziegfeld Follies.[9] Livermore had affairs with several of the dancers.[5] The couple had two sons: Jesse Livermore II, born in 1919 and Paul, born in 1922.[5] He then bought an expensive house in Great Neck and let his wife spend as much as she wanted on the furnishings.[5] In 1927, he and his wife were robbed at gunpoint in their home.[5] The relationship became strained by Dorothy's drinking habits, Livermore's affairs with other Zigfield girls, and their lavish spending.[5] In 1931, Dorothy Livermore filed for divorce and took up temporary residence in Reno, Nevada, with her new lover, James Walter Longcope. On September 16, 1932, the divorce was granted and she immediately married her boyfriend. She retained custody of their two sons and received a $10 million settlement.[5] Dorothy sold the house in Great Neck, on which Livermore spent $3.5 million, for $222,000. The house was then torn down, depressing Livermore.[5]

On March 28, 1933, 56-year old Livermore married 38-year-old singer and socialite, Harriet Metz Noble, in Geneva, Illinois. They had met in 1931 in Vienna, where Metz Noble was performing and Livermore was in the audience on vacation. Metz Noble was from a prominent Omaha family that had made a fortune in breweries. Livermore was Metz Noble's fifth husband; at least 2 of Metz's previous husbands had committed suicide, including Warren Noble, who hanged himself after the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[12][5]

Publications

In late 1939, Livermore's son, Jesse Jr., suggested to his father that he write a book about trading. The book, How To Trade In Stocks, was published by Duell, Sloan and Pearce in March 1940. The book did not sell well as World War II was underway and the general interest in the stock market was low. His investment methods were controversial at the time, and the book received mixed reviews upon publication.[9]

Suicide

On November 28, 1940, just after 5:30PM, Livermore fatally shot himself with an Automatic Colt Pistol in the cloakroom of the The Sherry-Netherland hotel in Manhattan, a place where he usually had cocktails. Police found a suicide note of 8 small handwritten pages in Livermore's personal, leather bound notebook.[7][13] The note was addressed to Livermore's wife, Harriet (whom Livermore nicknamed "Nina"), and it read, "My dear Nina: Can't help it. Things have been bad with me. I am tired of fighting. Can't carry on any longer. This is the only way out. I am unworthy of your love. I am a failure. I am truly sorry, but this is the only way out for me. Love Laurie".[9]

His son, Jesse Livermore Jr., committed suicide in 1975. His grandson also killed himse

 

 

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Edited by mitsubishi

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    • Quantower update! https://www.quantower.com/Here is what the latest version has to offer: 37 Predefined Options Strategies Volatility Smile chart for Options Series Cumulative Last Trade Size in DOM Trader Added OCO orders for Rithmic connection ________________________________37 Predefined Options StrategiesIn this release, we improved the Option Analytics panel by adding a list of 37 predefined option strategies that you can apply for analysis or trading with one click. For convenience, all strategies are divided into 4 categories: Up Trend Down Trend Volatility Based Arbitrage strategies For each strategy, you can see a general risk profile scheme, description, and structure, i.e. what options (Call or Put) it consists of. Once you have selected the desired strategy from the list, click on the “Add Strategy” button and it will appear in the bottom table “Test & Real Positions”. In this table, you can analyze several strategies at once, simply ticking off the necessary strikes.   It is important to note that all option strategies are built on the strikes closest to ATM (at-the-money). To extend the strategy profile, you need to manually add the necessary strikes via the Paper column in the options desk.Volatility Smile chartAnother improvement that we added to the Option Analytics panel is the Volatility Smile chart. It shows the implied volatility values for all strikes on the same line. This allows you to compare the value of options and understand is their overbought or oversold relative to each other. Cumulative Last Trade Size in DOM TraderChanged the display of the Last Trade Size, which was located on the price axis. In the new version, we placed Last Trade Size in a separate column and added a mechanism for accumulating trading volume, if the price did not change.For example, if the previous trade was on the Bid side, and then the latest trade is on the Ask side at the same price, then the Last Trade Size will add the value. But if the price will change on one tick up or down, then the Last Trade Size will be reset.   Added OCO orders for Rithmic connectionIn the last release, we have already added Bracket Orders, which allow you to reduce losses in case of an unfavorable trade. Today we present OCO orders (One Cancels Other), which is a widely known and popular order type among traders. Using the trading functionality of the Quantower platform, you can set two independent limit orders and combine them into an OCO group. When one of the orders is executed, the second will be automatically canceled.Additionally, for each limit order, you can set Bracket orders (SL and TP) and then merge them into a group. As ever, we’d love to hear what you think about Quantower, your feedback helps us improve whole the platform. Keep an eye out for future updates!
    • Quantower platform is a fast, modern and powerful trading platform developed by Quantower company. Thanks to wide customization, modularity and progressive solutions, our trading software can meet the specific needs of even the most demanding traders. Quantower has combined the best charting and analytical functionality in one application which gives professional traders more ways to reach the right trading decisions on different markets: Forex/CFDs, Stocks, Derivatives (Futures/Options), ETFs and ETNs. Key Benefits & Features: ✔ simultaneous connections to different brokers & data providers ✔ Futures, Stocks, Forex, CFDs, Options, Indices, ETFs trading ✔ 10+ chart types and styles – Time charts, Ticks, Kagi, Renko, Point & Figure, Linebreak, Range, Volume, Candles, Bars.     ✔ Volume Analysis tools – Volume profile, Cluster chart (Footprint), Time Statistics, Time histogram, Historical T&S ✔ VWAP and Custom VWAP (anchor VWAP) ✔ Power Trades Tool shows the execution of a large number of orders in a very short time ✔ Options Analytics panel for creating & analyzing Options Strategies, Risk profiles and Volatility Skew. ✔ DOM Surface panel shows changes of all limit orders in Order Book, their placing, modifying, canceling and execution. It allows you to see the intentions of large traders regarding the future price, high liquidity price levels. ✔ TPO Profile Chart shows the price distribution during the specified time ✔ one-click trading via Chart and DOM Trader panels ✔ various order types – Market, Limit, Stop, Brackets etc. ✔ panel for simulating of real-time trading on any trading or quoting connections ✔ creating & trading of Spreads and Synthetic Instruments ✔ manual & automative backtesting of trading strategies ✔ creating algorithmic strategies via Quantower Algo ✔ full customization of trading workspaces, panels, templates  
    • Date : 21st February 2020. GBPUSD – A Bear Trap? 21st FebruaryGBPUSD, H4This pair has been down significantly for two days to a new two-month low at 1.2848, although the UK economic data was relatively positive on both days. On Wednesday (February 19) it was retail prices, PPI and CPI, all of which came out well, and strengthened the GBP for a short time. However, shortly after the key data announcement the pair continued to plummet heavily into and during the US market. Wednesday closed down around 78 pips and Thursday (February 20) was the same, as the UK Retail Sales numbers came out positive. But the pair still closed down more than 35 pips as the Dollar remained dominant.US economic data also came out well on both days, and the US Dollar Index managed to reach an almost 3 year high at 99.79, while Brexit trade negotiations between the UK and the EU began to turn around again. In the case that the UK may have to leave the EU without a deal after the French Finance Minister has come out to comment that “we are separated”.From a technical perspective, the breakout of the support zone yesterday (February 20) at 1.2880 caused the H4 time frame to print signs of a bear trap, which must continue to develop to see if the pair can go up or not. In the Day time frame, yesterday the price came down to test the key support at the EMA 200 line and bounce back up. This makes today’s first support level 1.2880. If the price goes down and is able to pass this level, the next support level will be at yesterday’s low at around 1.2850, but if the price continues to rise there is resistance waiting at 1.2925 and 1.2950.However, today on the economic calendar there is still important economic data waiting. At 16:30, the UK announces PMI numbers for both manufacturing and services. At 21.45 hrs onwards, the United States will announce PMI and monthly home sales figures for January.Always trade with strict risk management. Your capital is the single most important aspect of your trading business.Please note that times displayed based on local time zone and are from time of writing this report.Click HERE to access the full HotForex Economic calendar.Want to learn to trade and analyse the markets? Join our webinars and get analysis and trading ideas combined with better understanding on how markets work. Click HERE to register for FREE!Click HERE to READ more Market news. Chayut Vachirathanakit Market Analyst – HF Educational Office – Thailand HotForex Disclaimer: This material is provided as a general marketing communication for information purposes only and does not constitute an independent investment research. Nothing in this communication contains, or should be considered as containing, an investment advice or an investment recommendation or a solicitation for the purpose of buying or selling of any financial instrument. All information provided is gathered from reputable sources and any information containing an indication of past performance is not a guarantee or reliable indicator of future performance. Users acknowledge that any investment in FX and CFDs products is characterized by a certain degree of uncertainty and that any investment of this nature involves a high level of risk for which the users are solely responsible and liable. We assume no liability for any loss arising from any investment made based on the information provided in this communication. This communication must not be reproduced or further distributed without our prior written permission.
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